Surveillance, policing and the control of territory

Title: Surveillance, policing and the control of territory

Associate Professor Darren Palmer, School of Humanities & Social Sciences Deakin University, Australian Surveillance Studies

Abstract

This paper seeks to draw upon research into the use of technology in the policing environment as a means to identify key issues  relating to Point of View technologies. The  literature  stems  from two sources. The first concerns recent research with colleagues into the use of ID scanners in the night time economy. I want to  use  this  research  as  part  of  the  framing  of  the  different  perspectives  on  how  we  might  approach consideration of the use of surveillance technology generally. The second literature approaches the nexus between  policing  and  technology  from  a  socio-­‐legal  perspective,  drawing  upon the  broader  literature examining the use technology to govern police practice, and in particular the requirement to record police interviews  with  suspects  (audio  and  where  possible/appropriate  video).  In  this  instance,  the  use  of technology  was  resisted by  police  but  has  now become, at least in Australia, a standard police  practice (though I am not suggesting there aren’t any problems in its use). I want to use this  literature to identify how we  might approach  new technologies, or at least the  adaptation of existing technologies  into new contexts, and the policy and legal developments shaping how POV technology is being used.

Biography

Dr  Darren  Palmer  (BA  Hons,  MA Criminological Studies,  PhD)  is  the  past convenor  of  the  new  major sequence  in Criminology in the  Bachelor of Arts  at Deakin University.  He  has  had  many  years  teaching experience  at  La  Trobe  University  (Law  &  Legal  Studies)and  Deakin  University  (Police  Studies/ Criminology). He  has  taught in  a  range of areas  including criminal justice, criminal law, psychology and crime, policing, and criminology research methods.

He has published widely in a number of areas and is a leading radio and television expert commentator on policing and criminal justice issues. He has published widely in a number of areas and is a leading radio and television expert commentator on policing and criminal justice issues.

His  current  research  interests  include  Policing  and  criminal justice  histories,  the  professionalization  of police practice, Police education, Police memorials, Police pursuits, changing forms of policing and security in  Australia  and  internationally,  the  impact  of  terrorism  on  policing,  Policing  accountability, managerialism, governmentality and prisoner access to tertiary study.

More information on Palmer at http://bit.ly/wmJS3J