Session 118 Technology and Society

IEEE Sections Congress, Sydney, Australia

John Lewis, Katina Michael, Narelle Clarke, 25 minutes

Aim: To demonstrate how SSIT helps avoid technology failures by identifying challenges in emerging technologies before they happen.

Katina: The rights and wrongs of implantables

John: Social challenges of health informatics

Narelle: Keeping a customer focus

IGNITE: Fall-down alerts with RFID

Title: Fall-down alerts with RFID: Behavioural Tracking of At-Risk Patients in a Campus Setting

Presenter: Katina Michael

Affiliation: University of Wollongong, Centre for Persuasive Technology and Society

Representation: Council on RFID

Description: Falls are the leading cause of injury in older persons. Using RFID you can track the movements of an older person with the ability to predict a fall based on patterns of movement in a home, retirement village or hospital. This brief presentation demonstrates the potential benefits of RFID in a positive application of human activity monitoring. Responses to the data recorded by RFID could be to alter conditions where it has been demonstrated that older persons have been prone to falling, providing additional reinforcements and supports in specific zones to prevent accidents, and as a real-time locator. The older person can also use the RFID device to signal for emergency assistance.

Support Sources:

Fall Detection: http://www.medicalalertadvice.com/fall-detection/

Using RFID to prevent or detect falls, wandering, bed egress and medication errors
US 7714728 B2: https://www.google.com/patents/US7714728

ELPAS: http://www.elpas.com/products/senior-fall-detection.aspx

Symposium on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Emerging Military Technologies

U.S. Relax Body-Modifying Regulation for Personnel Entering the Military: Floodgates Open to Emerging Electronic Tattoos for ID, Exoskeletons, Brain Implants and Beyond

Abstract

US military regulations for the four armed forces has always been very clear about tattoos regarding new personnel entering the ranks or for those already enlisted [[i]]. In short, the mentality has been one of uniformity, the ‘one group’ mantra, that says ‘you are all on the same side, you act as one, and anything different is unacceptable’. But since the new fashion of tattooing has taken root predominantly by Millennials, a subculture has emerged that says “this is my body and I will do with it what I want without your limitations.” It has meant that the US Military in particular given its diversity of citizenry has had to rethink its policies. When 30% of young males eligible to be recruited into the Forces are wearing a tattoo, your pool of prospective personnel is significantly reduced. If your rule of thumb hasn’t kept pace with the trends of the day, then as a military you are forced to make some very drastic changes [[ii]]. The new regulation now states that for the Army, soldiers can now get their arms, legs and most of their bodies covered in tattoos. That is a far cry from the very strict regulations that limited tattoos to where they could be concealed. Face, neck and hand tattoos, however, remain against regulation, with the exception of a ring tattoo in each hand. Additionally, tattoos that are racist or sexist are still outlawed [[iii]]. For a short time, the regulation had been revised, incrementally getting stricter and more specified, to allow soldiers to wear four tattoos below the elbow or knee not bigger than a hand-span but this was difficult to enforce. Still problematic for military recruiters, the US Armed Forces that consist of the Army [[iv]], Marine Corps, Navy [v], Air Force [[vi]] and Coast Guard, have revised their regulations (e.g. see Army Regulation 670 -1) to give soldiers greater freedoms in their appearance.

But these changes may well suit the military with the advent of emerging technologies such as electronic tattoos possibly replacing the century old dog tag introduced in the early 1900s, known as identity discs. There are also exoskeletons in full experimental phases for various military applications that are worn, and even brain implants in their nascent research phase for overcoming post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and memory loss that pierce beneath the skin. Thus, relaxing the regulation for wearing tattoos, now means that the US military is not in breach of its own regulation in instituting trials that require the wearing or even bearing of new emerging technologies. The question is whether or not a soldier who is asked to wear or bear a device that will invariably be interconnected, has a choice to opt-out for a favoured alternative. However, it seems highly unlikely that any form of resistance from soldiers will be acceptable. The response might well be from the military, “if we let you wear tattoos, or bear other types of chips for convenience, then what’s the difference if we tag you with an electronic ID for your own welfare, and possibly ask you to bear a brain implant as well if you need it in the course of duty or as a veteran”? Increasingly, this seems a plausible scenario, despite the doubters who said: “it will never happen”.

Biography: Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. She is the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine editor-in-chief and also serves as the senior editor of the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine. Since 2008 she has been a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation, and also served as Vice-Chair. She has also completed studies in Transnational Crime Prevention in the Faculty of Law, at the University of Wollongong. She studies the social implications of emerging technologies predominantly within a national security context. Her annual SINS (social implications of national security) workshop began in 2006 under the then ARC-RNSA Research Network for a Secure Australia (Human Factors group). www.katinamichael.com

References

[i] “Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia”, Army Regulation 670–1, http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r670_1.pdf

[ii] David Vergun, March 31, 2014, “Army tightens personal appearance, tattoo policy”, https://www.army.mil/article/122978/Army_tightens_personal_appearance__tattoo_policy

[iii] Staff Report, April 10, 2015, “It's official: Army issues new tattoo rules”, Army Times, http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/careers/army/2015/04/10/army-regs-tattoos-uniforms/25576197/

[iv] Luke Villaplaz, November 4, 2015, “US Army Tattoo Policy 2015: Military Relaxes Rules and Regulations For Army Soldiers”, International Business Times, http://www.ibtimes.com/us-army-tattoo-policy-2015-military-relaxes-rules-regulations-army-soldiers-1878378

[v] Mark D. Faram, March 31, 2016, “The Navy just approved the military's best tattoo rules”, Navy Times, http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/2016/03/31/navy-just-approved-militarys-best-tattoo-rules/82425974/

[vi] Oriana Pawlyk, April 5, 2016,“Air Force to review its tattoo policy”, AirForce Times, http://www.airforcetimes.com/story/military/2016/04/05/air-force-review-its-tattoo-policy/32575947/

Melbourne, 29–30 May 2017, University of Melbourne, PREMT, Future of War

More here

Cyberday @ ASU 2017

Cyber Day Keynote:

Dr. Katina Michaelis a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong

11.45 am - 12.30 pm, 19th May 2017

Title: Privacy of the Mined and the Heart: Hacking the Body With or Without a Warrant

Domestic Panel:

Joe Gervais, Lifelock / Symantec

Caroline Lynch, Owner of Copper Hill Strategies, LLC, previously Chief Counsel of the House Judiciary Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations Subcommittee

James MelendresPartner at Snell & Wilmer

International Panel:

Brad Allenby, President’s Professor, and Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering; Director, Center for Earth Systems Engineering and Management / Arizona State University

Andy GordonFounding Partner of Coppersmith Schermer & Brockelman, PLC. From 2009 through 2010, Counsel, Department of Homeland Security / Arizona State University

Heather RoffCybersecurity Fellow, her research interests pertain to international ethics, security, and emerging military technology, particularly cyber warfare, lethal autonomous weapons, and unmanned systems / Arizona State University

Josephine WolffNew America Cybersecurity Initiative Fellow, Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Computing Security, Rochester Institute of Technology

More here

Columbo (Season 7, Episode 4): “How to Dial a Murder”, Columbo says the murderer:

“You claim that you were at the physicians getting your heart examined… which was true [Colombo unravels a roll of ECG readings)… the electrocardiogram, Sir. Just before 3 o’clock your physician left you alone for a resting trace. At that moment you were lying down in a restful position and your heart showed a calm, slow, easy beat [pointing to the ECG read-out]. Look at this part, right here [Colombo points to the reading], lots of sudden stress, lots of excitement, right here at 3 o’clock, your heart beating like a hammer just before the dogs attacked… Oh you killed him with a phone call, Sir… I’ll bet my life on it. Very simple case. Not that I’m particularly bright, Sir… I must say, I found you disappointing, I mean your incompetence, you left enough clues to sink a ship. Motive. Opportunity. And for a man of your intelligence Sir, you got caught on a lot of stupid lies. A lot.”

Governance of Emerging Technology 2017

The Fifth Annual Conference on Governance of Emerging Technologies: Law, Policy and Ethics held at the new

Beus Center for Law & Society in Phoenix, AZ

May 17-19, 2017

Call for Abstracts – Now Closed

Title: Coming to Grips with Evidence-Based Policing: Body Worn Video Recorders and Beyond

presented by Katina Michael in "Big Data" session at GET Conference

 

Session 5.2 Big Data and the Individual
Room: TBD
Moderator:  Diva Galan, LG Tech-Link Global and Center for Law, Science & Innovation, Arizona State University

  • 5.2.1.  Who Owns “You”?: The Need to Craft a Means of Personal Ownership for One’s Digital Self
    Jeremy Weissman, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Carolina
  • 5.2.2.  The Artificial Revolution: Rethinking the Future of Intellectual Property in a World Without Limits
    Aviv Gaon, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
  • 5.2.3.  Building Responsible Governance Mechanisms for DIY Health
    Eleonore Pauwels, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
  • 5.2.4.  Stakeholder Engagement at the Intersection of Big Data and Criminal Justice
    Kimberly Gardner, School of Public Service, Boise State University

The conference will consist of plenary and session presentations and discussions on regulatory, governance, legal, policy, social and ethical aspects of emerging technologies, including (but not limited to) nanotechnology, synthetic biology, gene editing, biotechnology, genomics, personalized medicine, human enhancement technologies, telecommunications, information technologies, surveillance technologies, geoengineering, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and robotics. The conference is premised on the belief that there is much to be learned and shared from and across the governance experience and proposals for these various emerging technologies.

Some particular themes that will be emphasized at this year’s conference include cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, drones, CRISPR/gene editing, big data, data analytics, transnational coordination, technology unemployment, internet of things, neuroscience, privacy, longevity, bitcoin/blockchain, and digital health.

More here

Please visit http://www.katinamichael.com/sins12/ for the Visual Proceedings of the Social Implications of National Security on POV in Law Enforcement.

Location-based Everything: Are we ready for uberveillance?

Presented by Katina Michael

A sign at a shopping mall that describes the location tracking of smartphones is taking place. Most consumers would not have a clue what this is about. The surveillance is described for the purposes of "enhancing" your shopping experience.

A sign at a shopping mall that describes the location tracking of smartphones is taking place. Most consumers would not have a clue what this is about. The surveillance is described for the purposes of "enhancing" your shopping experience.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017
11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
McCord Hall (MCRD) 164, Tempe campus [map]
Sign up to attend by Monday, May 15, 2017

Want to watch the live stream? Contact Melissa Waite at melissa.waite@asu.edu for details.

ABSTRACT

Location is fundamental to every interaction that happens on earth. Increasingly, the personal and work-related smart devices we use are packed with sensors that record the who (ID), where (location), when (time), and how (mode of transport/condition) of a user’s digital chronicle. Both commercially led initiatives (e.g. objective and subjective mapping of every inch of the globe) and law enforcement motivations (e.g. digital evidence management systems for criminal convictions) have been responsible for generating big data for user convenience and security purposes. This presentation will demonstrate the metadata generated from simple data logging devices, and use scenarios to point to current and future societal implications. While the benefits of these real-time monitoring and tracking capabilities promise to reduce crime rates and make life easier for all, uberveillance will also lead to misinformation, misinterpretation of data, and information manipulation if the commensurate safeguards are not put in place. Policy challenges in the Australian landscape will be discussed with an emphasis on regulation.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Katina Michael is a Professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. Until recently, she was the Associate Dean – International for the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences. She has a BIT (UTS), MTransCrimPrev (UOW), and a PhD (UOW). She previously worked for Nortel Networks as a senior network and business planner until December 2002. Katina is a senior member of the IEEE Society on the Social Implications of Technology where she has edited IEEE Technology and Society Magazine for the last 5+ years, and senior edited IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine for the last 2 years. Katina is an active member of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

The multiple gazes of veillance. Multiple camera recordings corroborating an event. Katina is being surveilled by her student Deniz Gokyer, and another camera further away is surveilling both Deniz and Katina while they chat at UOW. Evidence... evidence... and more evidence...

In 2009 my research team and I used Google Latitude to share our real-time location coordinates. In May 2010, this user "byron ji" is a stranger who has requested I share my location. I obviously did not.

In 2009 my research team and I used Google Latitude to share our real-time location coordinates. In May 2010, this user "byron ji" is a stranger who has requested I share my location. I obviously did not.

Evidence from my gmail account that Google would send me an email about once a month to ensure that I knew I was sharing my location with certain people. Later, due to consumer pressure, this warning email came more often- about once a week. It meant that even if a spouse had covertly downloaded Latitude onto the handset, that the user would receive an alert within a week to say "your location is being shared".

Evidence from my gmail account that Google would send me an email about once a month to ensure that I knew I was sharing my location with certain people. Later, due to consumer pressure, this warning email came more often- about once a week. It meant that even if a spouse had covertly downloaded Latitude onto the handset, that the user would receive an alert within a week to say "your location is being shared".

While Google Latitude is now dead, the feature of Latitude has been incorporated into Google Maps and will be available to all those who download the new updates. For a long while, privacy advocates fought to find out WHAT information Google retained of consumer digital location chronicles. The answer is 'too much'. Around 2010, Google proclaimed they only kept the "last recorded" location of any user. The wording of that response to international NGOs led them to believe that Google was tracking a lot more. It is a well-known fact that if you have wi-fi settings ON on your handset, then Google knows quite accurately where you are at any given point in time.

While Google Latitude is now dead, the feature of Latitude has been incorporated into Google Maps and will be available to all those who download the new updates. For a long while, privacy advocates fought to find out WHAT information Google retained of consumer digital location chronicles. The answer is 'too much'. Around 2010, Google proclaimed they only kept the "last recorded" location of any user. The wording of that response to international NGOs led them to believe that Google was tracking a lot more. It is a well-known fact that if you have wi-fi settings ON on your handset, then Google knows quite accurately where you are at any given point in time.

Since 2008, Ushahidi has developed free and open-source software for information collection, visualisation, and interactive mapping. While Ushahidi were providing a platform for crowdsourcing location and other information, private corporations such as Google have harvested data for profit. The two aims are very different. Above we can see a fleet of Google StreetView cars, fitted with 360 degree cameras. Additionally, there are other recording mediums- Google Trekker on humans or on horseback (as shown above), Google Snowmobiles, and even Google Gondolas. Google has called the international community to get on board with their surveillance of every inch of public space on the Earth's surface. We certainly have the benefit of all of this data in our everyday navigation systems as consumers, but what are the implications of this kind of pervasive view of the world at street level? We have Satellite views, and we are now trying to amass even more than StreetView, to Person View systems.

The SuperTrackstick location data logger. We received ethics approval from the Human Research Ethics Committee at UOW to study the consequences of tracking individuals. Our studies showed the pervasive nature of continuous GPS monitoring. While a data logger such as this is somewhat alarming to be 'attached' to the body, our smartphones have on average about 14 different sensors embedded measuring more than just location. If our settings are on for "location enablement" then most likely we are emitting data to third parties even if we don't realise it. What are some of the implications of behavioural biometrics or human activity monitoring is a very good question.

The SuperTrackstick location data logger. We received ethics approval from the Human Research Ethics Committee at UOW to study the consequences of tracking individuals. Our studies showed the pervasive nature of continuous GPS monitoring. While a data logger such as this is somewhat alarming to be 'attached' to the body, our smartphones have on average about 14 different sensors embedded measuring more than just location. If our settings are on for "location enablement" then most likely we are emitting data to third parties even if we don't realise it. What are some of the implications of behavioural biometrics or human activity monitoring is a very good question.

Web Science Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Colloquium

Symphonic social science and the future for big data research

Abstract: 

Over recent years there has been a persistent tension between proponents of big data analytics on the one hand - using new forms of digital data to make computational and statistical claims about ‘the social’ - and, on the other hand, many social scientists who are skeptical about the value of big data, its associated methods and claims to knowledge. This talk seeks to move beyond this, taking inspiration from a mode of argumentation developed by some of the most successful social science books of all time: Bowling Alone (Putnam 2000). The Spirit Level (Wilkinson and Pickett 2009) and Capital (Piketty 2014). Taken together these works can be distinguishedas a new approach, that can be labelled as‘symphonic social science’. This bears both striking similarities and significant differences to the big data paradigm and – as such – offers the potential to do big data analytics differently. The talk will suggest that this offers value to those already working with big data – for whom the difficulties of making useful and sustainable claims about the social are increasingly apparent – and tosocial scientists, offering a mode of practice that might shape big data analytics for the future.

Susan Halford, Professor of Sociology

Professor Susan Halford is Director, Web Science Institute within Social Sciences at the University of Southampton. Her research interests range from the sociology of work and organization - with projects on the third sector, the ageing workforce and employee driven innovation - to the sociology of technology and specifically the World Wide Web. She has a particular interest in the politics of data and digital artefacts, information infrastructures and digital research methods.

Professor Halford has a background in Geography (she studied at the University of Sussex 1981-4) and Urban Studies (also at Sussex 1985-1990) and moved into Sociology when she joined the University of Southampton in 1992. Since this time she has developed a range of research around the themes of gender, work, and identity and - connected to this - exploring digital innovation in the workplace, and beyond particularly through Web Science in collaboration with colleagues in Health Sciences and Computer Sciences.

More here: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci/about/staff/sjh3.page

Web Science Doctoral & Post-Doctoral Colloquium

Professor Susan Halford and Professor Katina Michael will be going off-site for a collaborative colloquium with key PhD and post-doctoral students who will be presenting on their research.

Lunch at 1.30 pm, Gerroa Fisherman's Club

Sightseeing 3pm-4.30pm, Seven Mile Beach

Presentations at 5pm: format (10-30 min presentations, followed by 10 min discussion for each participant)

 4 PhD students from the University of Southampton, UK

     - Participant 1: Jack WebsterWeb Science Centre for Doctoral Training

Title: Algorithmic Taste-Makers: How are Music Recommender Systems Performing as "Cultural Intermediaries" and Shaping Cultural Consumption Practices?

Abstract: The digital age has seen the rise of new cultural intermediaries in the music marketplace. Music streaming services have invested heavily in the development of recommendation systems, which are used to enhance the quality of their user experience by selecting and organising music in a personalised fashion. As they seek to shape what we consume and how we come to consume it, music recommender systems have the potential to impact on cultural consumption practices and taste formation processes. Indeed, the automated nature of these systems means they have the potential to intervene in these social processes at a rate and scale not previously encountered. Whilst existing social science literature has begun to speculate on the impact of their cultural intermediation, little attention has been given to what music recommender systems are, how they come to exist and operate in the field, or how interaction with these systems is shaping consumption practices. The aim of my PhD is to advance our understanding of how music recommender systems are performing as cultural intermediaries and shaping consumption practice. This presentation will offer a window into my research and provide a brief account of what I have learnt so far about the cultural intermediary work of music recommender systems.

Bio: Jack is a second-year Web Science PhD student at the University of Southampton, UK. His research focusses on how the music recommender systems used by music streaming services, such as Spotify, are operating as "cultural intermediaries," shaping how cultural goods and symbolic value are circulated in the field of cultural consumption. Jack is an interdisciplinary researcher, combining perspectives from the social and computer sciences to understand both how music recommender systems work, but also how they are experienced by consumers and the rationale behind their design and implementation. If you would like to find out more Jack and his research, please visit www.jwebster.net.

     - Participant 2: C.N. Tochia, Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training

Title: Does craving a digital detox make me a bad digital citizen?

Abstract: My PhD topic is looking at digital literacy and in particular joining the argument that busts the myth of the "digital native" concept. A lot of work has been done in this area already, but I believe there is a unique group of people born just before the digital / information age took over, however have a very good understanding and grasp of new digital technologies they come into contact with. Some of them are known already as the want-nots. This group therefore understands and sometimes craves the pre-digital era and I would like to understand what deters them from choosing some new technologies or wanting to access the Web less or not at all. I also have a general interest in online identities and behaviours, particularly how we present ourselves on and off the screen.

Bio: After completing a degree in Advertising and Marketing Communications from Bournemouth University I joined the advertising industry working at OMD, an Omnicom media agency. Beginning first in their Communications department then moving across to their Insight department I managed several projects across clients such as Boots, Vodafone, Hasbro, Pepsi Co and Disney. Then I moved back to a company I previously interned at, Substance Global, that specialises in PR and marketing films, TV and games. There I worked in the Social team managing over 100 + accounts for brands such as Warner Bros Interactive, 20th Century Fox, Paramount and HBO.

     - Participant 3: Robert D. Blair, Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training

Title: Social media, learning and risk

Abstract: Social media is much lauded as a powerful tool for use in support of non-formal learning, and a tool of choice for teenagers. With this in mind the aims of my research were to determine the position of, and the barriers to the use of social media in support of learning activities by school pupils. To achieve these aims an investigation of the perceptions and use of social media by primary stakeholders at the operational level was conducted.

Data was collected from pupils and teachers using both quantitative and qualitative methods. 384 pupils responded to an online survey and 96 pupils participated in semi-structured focus group interviews. As a ratio comparable to the average teacher to pupil ratio in English secondary schools 18 teachers participated in semi-structured, individual interviews. The findings suggest that the main reason social media does not appear to be having an impact is a perception of risk. Initial findings indicated that usage of social media for learning was dominated by logistical task support (for example, clarifying instructions) mostly focused on homework activities. On further investigation findings suggest that activities which support general school work and a deeper engagement through homework understanding are taking place with a not insubstantial number of pupils.

The research findings also indicate that though social media is being used by this age group to support their learning, generally in a dyadic fashion, factors other than pupil skill and imagination in the use of social media may be in play. Of these other factors a the primary factor suggested by the findings appears to be a perceived risk to social capital accrued in a time of life in which social capital is assuming increasing importance.The reluctance of teachers to promote social media as a tool to support learning support through knowledge sharing by pupils appears to stem primarily from the possibility of risk to pupil welfare followed by professional risk to the teacher then risk to institution. With a recognition and understanding of the perceptions of risk held by the primary stakeholder at the operational level the next stage of this work is to determine how to reconcile and overcome these barriers to access the power of networked to technologies to support socially constructed learning.

Bio: Robert Blair is a final year PhD candidate at the Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training, department of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. He holds an MSc Information Systems from the University of East Anglia and an MSc Web Science from the University of Southampton. For his PhD research Robert is investigating the driving factors affecting change in the use of digital technologies. In particular, he is interested in the apparent enthusiasm for the use of Social Media displayed by children and young adults and the possibility of how this may be leveraged to support formal and non-formal learning. Prior to commencing his research Robert gained over 20 years experience of teaching Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science in compulsory, further and higher education.

     - Participant 4: Faranak Hardcastle, Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training

Abstract: This talk will be loosely based on a draft submitted to TOIT's Special Section on Computational Ethics and Accountability that is currently under review. As part of it I will introduce a conceptual sociotechnical intervention called TATE (Targeted Advertising Tracking Extension) that - using semantic web technologies, W3C PROV model, and the concept of sociotechnical imaginary - aims to contribute to supporting accountability in the Online Behavioural Tracking and Advertising (OBTA) landscape. On-going work involves evaluating a hypothetical implementation and normalisation of this model informed by STS theories to identify overlapping interests, values, and incentives of various stakeholder groups to map its design to these spaces. 

Bio: Faranak is a PhD candidate at the Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Southampton. Studying Web Science has challenged her views about society and technology. She is currently interested in critically engaging with the Web and the Internet from the intersection of arts and design, technology, sociology, and STS, and continuously tries to avoid letting the disciplinary boundaries to discipline her "thinking”, “designing", and “making”.

2 students and 1 honorary from UOW's School of Computing and Information Technology

     - Honorary Fellow Dr Roba AbbasPersuasive Technology and Society

Title: Big (Geospatial) Data and Location Intelligence in Action: The Consumer Perspective

Abstract: The big data movement has, in recent years, promised to deliver a wide range of benefits to organisations, offering business insights generated through the analysis of vast and varied datasets. The potential to create an enhanced understanding of consumer and corporate opportunities, through the extraction of trends and patterns, is certainly appealing from a business perspective. Increased emphasis is now being placed on the use of geospatial datasets. This essentially refers to “geo-enriched” data; data that is supplemented with a geographic component, and when contextualised, layered with additional levels of detail, and analysed, provides some form of “location intelligence”. The proliferation of consumer location-based services (LBS) applications, in conjunction with the wealth of publicly accessible geospatial data and supporting applications, now signifies that location intelligence activities are not exclusive to geographic information systems (GIS) professionals, as was traditionally the case. Rather, advanced mapping and location capabilities are now accessible to the individual user or consumer. This presentation provides a practical demonstration of consumer-level location intelligence and the societal implications of “geo-enriched” data analysis more specifically.

Biography: Dr Roba Abbas is an Honorary Fellow with the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at the University of Wollongong, Australia and is the Associate Editor (Administrator) for the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. She completed her Australian Research Council (ARC)-funded Doctor of Philosophy on the topic of Location-Based Services Regulation in 2012, earning special commendations for her thesis titled “Location-Based Services Regulation in Australia: A Socio-Technical Approach”.

    - Mr Asslam Umar Ali, Doctoral Candidate, School of Computing and Information Technology

Title: Analysis Framework to Integrate Knowledge Derived from Social Media for Civic Co-Management during Extreme Climatic Events

Abstract: Information generated on social media during extreme climatic events has forever changed disaster relief and response. This information shared as private conversation on public social media platforms is reliant on citizens to share their personal information and knowledge. This type of content generated by individuals with geospatial information has been termed ‘Volunteered Geographical Information’. A large number of VGI have used social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook to crowd-source disaster information in real-time for effective management of infrastructure systems and their population. Therefore, providing more eyes on the ground and a source of intelligence that serve to improve situational awareness. On the other hand, managing the disaster activities is challenging, complex and involves various stakeholders; agencies, organisation, managing individual with different roles, resources and goal. This also puts time constraints on the decision makers make information intensive activities. Therefore, it challenging to coordinate or obtain timely and right type information from the social media channels. More importantly the disaster management activities follow a standard set of disaster management plans with set goals. Whereas, currently crowdsourced applications do not generally interact to share knowledge with the existing disaster management activities. This presentation shows results of social media data analysis obtained during floods and provides some interesting insights to type information (text/photos) shared, their relationship and how this could used by emergency management teams. 

Bio: Asslam Umar Ali is a Business Intelligence professional at the Information Management Unit, University of Wollongong. His educational background connects the technology and business spectrum, with a bachelors degree in Electronics Engineering and a Master in International Business and a MBA specialisation in Engineering Management. Asslam is enthusiastic about data analytics, visualisation and data informed decision making.

   - Associate Research Fellow and PhD Candidate, Robert Ogie, SMART Infrastructure Facility*

Check-in at Park Ridge hotel at 4.45 pm

Seminars presented at the Gerringong Bowlo

Who would have thought that the Gerringong Bowlo had a full-blown conference facility? We discovered this, after we took up several tables for an informal kind of meeting, and we were directed to a facility with Projector, Screen, Digitally equipped room with excellent tables and chairs. "Thank you Bowlo"- we will come again! You were so hospitable to our needs and our visitors from the UK will never ever forget your generosity.

Dinner at 11.30 pm at Domino's Pizza :)

Well what does one do when Kiama, Gerringong and Gerroa go to sleep at 8.30pm? Go to trusted Domino's for the best vegetarian and meatlovers and non-cheese pizza on the planet... well, we don't know if that's really the case but after hunting for somewhere to eat for over 2 hours, that is what it felt like. We got in this predicament when our seminars went for DOUBLE the time they should have, as the affinity grew in the group. We then approached a local pub to allow us to eat our pizzas comfortably and were escorted to an open garden area under the stars which was just spectacular.

Close 12 am, Kiama Blowhole.

You simply cannot venture to Kiama, NSW, and NOT see the Kiama Blowhole. Just a magical ending, to a magical day. Thank you to our visitors from WSI SOTON and to our local students and PhDs from UOW for a brilliant synergistic day. A special thank you to the Persuasive Technology and Systems Group for sponsoring our breakfast and lunch meals.

Biometrics Institute Privacy Panel

Privacy - Currency or Victim of Convenience?

Commentaries will draw on their unique backgrounds, expertise and experiences.

Moderator: Hon Terry Aulich, Head of Privacy and Policy

Expert Group, Biometrics Institute Panel:

Dr Elizabeth Coombs

Acting NSW Privacy Commissioner. As Acting NSW Privacy Commissioner, Dr Elizabeth Coombs' role includes promoting privacy as well as preparing reports recommending legislative, administrative or other action in the interests of privacy as well as conducting inquiries and investigations into privacy related matters.

Dr Katina Michael

Professor, School of Information Systems and Technology University of Wollongong Katina is the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine editor-in-chief, and IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine associate editor. Since 2008 she has been a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation, and until recently was the Vice-Chair. Michael researches on the socio-ethical implications of emerging technologies.

John Kendall

Member of the Biometrics Institute’s Privacy & Policy Expert Group and Director Security Programs - Asia Pacific, Unisys John is a subject matter expert in the application of biometrics and identification, having developed deep first hand insight into how organisations can leverage these technologies to achieve improved efficiency and greater security in the areas of law enforcement, corrections and civil identification.

Stephen Wilson 

Founder, Lockstep Consulting Stephen Wilson is a researcher, innovator, analyst and adviser in digital identity and privacy. He recently conducted a feasibility study and design for the Biometrics Institute's proposed Privacy Trust Mark. 

Agenda here

Are People Really Being Microchipped?

The microchipping of people is not a new phenomenon. Heart pacemakers have been around since the late 1950s. But implantable devices, for humancentric use, entered the technology landscape in 1997 when Eduardo Kac performed his bioethics art piece, ”Time Capsule”.  Since then, thousands of people have embarked on implantable devices, with convenience as the chief motivator. In 2003, the Verichip Company formed and in response to September 11, launched a suite of applications that required a small radio frequency identification (RFID) device to be implanted in the right tricep.  These products are now marketed not only to those interested in body modification, but also to corporates. That people are being microchipped voluntarily is a reality, especially for those who believe in human augmentation as a means of evolution.  This talk will introduce global conversations regarding the use, and a wider diffusion of, embedded implantable systems and participants will have an opportunity to share their ideas on the topic.

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What a wonderful afternoon spent at the North Kiama Neighbourhood Centre with the U3A folk in the Kiama Municipality. I was so encouraged to see so many community members turn out. Every seat in the room was taken and the contributions to the interactive discussion were insightful, wise and holistic. U3A at Kiama you are to be commended for such excellent organisation, participation, and ongoing support.

Unsurprisingly, this was one of the most informed audiences I've had the pleasure of delivering a talk to- astute on ethics speak, great questions,  and all round knowledgeable contributions.

Thank you all for your active participation, for the gift, and for the invitation.