Session 118 Technology and Society

IEEE Sections Congress, Sydney, Australia

John Lewis, Katina Michael, Narelle Clarke, 25 minutes

Aim: To demonstrate how SSIT helps avoid technology failures by identifying challenges in emerging technologies before they happen.

Katina: The rights and wrongs of implantables

John: Social challenges of health informatics

Narelle: Keeping a customer focus

IGNITE: Fall-down alerts with RFID

Title: Fall-down alerts with RFID: Behavioural Tracking of At-Risk Patients in a Campus Setting

Presenter: Katina Michael

Affiliation: University of Wollongong, Centre for Persuasive Technology and Society

Representation: Council on RFID

Description: Falls are the leading cause of injury in older persons. Using RFID you can track the movements of an older person with the ability to predict a fall based on patterns of movement in a home, retirement village or hospital. This brief presentation demonstrates the potential benefits of RFID in a positive application of human activity monitoring. Responses to the data recorded by RFID could be to alter conditions where it has been demonstrated that older persons have been prone to falling, providing additional reinforcements and supports in specific zones to prevent accidents, and as a real-time locator. The older person can also use the RFID device to signal for emergency assistance.

Support Sources:

Fall Detection: http://www.medicalalertadvice.com/fall-detection/

Using RFID to prevent or detect falls, wandering, bed egress and medication errors
US 7714728 B2: https://www.google.com/patents/US7714728

ELPAS: http://www.elpas.com/products/senior-fall-detection.aspx

Microchipping Beyond Body Modification: New ID for Ticketing and Transportation?

Title: Microchipping Beyond Body Modification: New ID for Ticketing and Transportation?

Abstract: For some time we have witnessed the advent of humans bearing implantable devices for a myriad of non-functional uses. We have grown accustomed to people wearing tattoos on their faces and forearms, piercing noses and tongues, and even implanting wedges of silicon beneath the skin. All of these microchips have modified the body of the individual for mainly aesthetic purposes. Enter the emerging range of ID chips embedded beneath the skin that are now being trialled for ticketing in transit applications and transportation. The last 24 months have seen a spate of small-scale (even one-person participant observer trials) of people implanting unique ID chips into their bodies as part of functional application trials. We've seen people board a plane without a physical boarding pass in Scandanavia. We've seen people enter parking lots with just a wave of a hand in Glebe, NSW. We've seen people embed a chip that links to their mobile phone for payment. And more recently we've witnessed a local man from Sydney use his implantable device to board a train, instead of a physical PVC-based Opal Card. In effect, the man had embedded an Opal chip into his hand. This seminar will examine these single case studies and consider the pros and cons of going completely cashless and paperless for ticketing and transportation. Do you think this is our future? To be microchipped like dogs and cats? Or do you think it is technology better left outside the human body? Come and discuss these questions with peers in your local Municipality.

About the Speaker: Dr Katina Michael is a professor in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at the University of Wollongong. She joined UOW in 2002 after a career in telecommunications engineering at Nortel Networks. Her research is in the area of the social implications of emerging technologies with an emphasis on national security. Katina is the editor in chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, and senior editor of IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine. She resides in the Kiama Municipality with her husband and three children. Most days she can be found wandering Illawarra beaches for an hour or so. See also: www.uberveillance.com; www.katinamichael.com.

This talk has been commissioned by Kiama Mixed Probus group that will meet at the Kiama Leagues Club on August 2, 2017. Kiama Mixed Probus Club was instigated in 1994 by Philip and Marian Russell. More here.

Expected audience: 60 people.

Internet of Medical Things: Balancing Benefits with Risks - BioPharma Research Council

BioPharma Research Council

BioPharma Research Council (BRC) webinar entitled: The Internet of Medical Things: Balancing Benefits with Risks on July 27th.

Featured experts in cybersecurity and related applications who will bring their experience to bear on what should be built into connected devices and systems to ensure privacy and security.

  *   Date: Thursday, July 27th, 2017
  *   Start Time:  1pm EST,12:00 pm CDT, 9:00am PDT
  *   End Time: 3:30pm EST, 2:30pm CDT, 11:30pm PDT

Background
BRC is hosting an Internet of Medical Things (IOMT) webinar that will weigh in on questions concerning the privacy and security of devices, systems, users, and databases.  Advantages of connectivity and automated data collection will be considered in light of responsibilities and liabilities of all parties regarding rights, intellectual property, privacy and security in a cyber environment.

Risks and liabilities must be weighed relative to the overall benefits to the connected organizations and their patients.  Not only will these systems provide ease of connectivity and data collection, but more important, patients could benefit by finding existing therapies or clinical trials that may treat their condition.  In addition, improved data collection over larger number of subjects could lead to a more comprehensive determination of drug efficacy and safety profiles.

There is a need to address two main questions:
1.  How are organizations currently mitigating risks to security and privacy in balance with innovating to keep pace with threats to devices, systems and applications; and,
2.  What are the strategies, plans, and processes being considered to reduce anticipated risks to patients and safeguards their benefits.

What constitutes an acceptable risk and liability profile while realizing benefits to connected organizations and their patients in the face of escalating threats.

Katina Michael will be addressing issues from her research from the last decade on embedded devices, uberveillance, and the associated privacy and cyber security impacts. What are some of the most egregious privacy and security risks that you’ve found with the devices? What do you see as the trend for medical devices to come? What can device engineers do to improve the security and privacy of their devices?

Expected Audience:
Professionals and practitioners working in connectivity, automated data collection, and data sources such as hospital equipment, implants, wearables, consumer devices, and related databases.

  *   Clinical professionals in IT and trial management
  *   Device developers
  *   Device software developers
  *   System software developers
  *   Website developers
  *   System Architects
  *   Database Administrators
  *   Clinical Laboratory Managers
  *   Risk Assessors
  *   Chief Risk Officers
  *   Healthcare information security professionals
  *   Healthcare privacy professionals
  *   Healthcare IT practitioners
  *   Legal professionals
  *   Regulatory officials

Each presentation will be followed with dialog (Q&A chat box), and the event will conclude with a panel of regulatory representatives addressing risk-reward trade-offs in data collection, cybersecurity, privacy and public policy and regulations.

Main contacts: Rebecca Herold, Tom Fare, Ronnye Schreiber

Overview

BRC is hosting an Internet of Medical Things (IOMT) webinar that will weigh in on questions concerning the privacy and security of devices, systems, users, and databases.Advantages of connectivity and automated data collection will be considered in light of responsibilities and liabilities of all parties regarding rights, intellectual property, and security in a cyber environment.

Risks and liabilities must be weighed relative to the overall benefits to the connected organizations and their patients. Not only will these systems provide ease of connectivity and data collection, but more important, patients could benefit by finding existing therapies or clinical trials that may treat their condition. In addition, improved data collection over larger number of subjects could lead to a more comprehensive determination of drug efficacy and safety profiles.

DATE: Thursday, July 27th, 2017

START TIME: 1:00 PM EST (12:00 PM CDT/9:00 AM PDT)

END TIME: 3:30 PM EST (2:30 PM CDT/11:30 AM PDT)

Register here

AGENDA

1:00-1:05 Welcome and Introductions
Ronnye Schreiber
Board of Directors
BRC

1:05-1:10 Overview
Rebecca Herold
President
Simbus360
CEO Privacy Professor

1:10-1:35 CISO’s struggles with securing medical devices
Mitch Parker
Executive Director
Information Security & Compliance
Indiana University Health

1:35-2:00 Security Risk Management Throughout the Medical Device Life Cycle
Steven Abrahamson
Senior Director
Product Cyber Security
GE Healthcare

2:00-2:25 Current medical breakthroughs with IOMT medical devices
Dave Saunders
Senior VP Product Development, Co-Founder
Galen Robotics

2:25-2:50 The future of IOMT
Katina Michael
Professor
University of Wollongong

2:50-3:15 Roundtable: What Regulators are Looking For
Deven McGraw
Deputy Director
Health Information Privacy at Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Linda Ricci
Associate Director
Office of Device Evaluation Digital Health
FDA’s Center Director for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) 

3:15-3:25 Summary
Rebecca Herold

3:25-3:30 Parting thoughts
Ronnye Schreiber

Presenter Backgrounds

Ronnye Schreiber

Ronnye co-founded PlanetConnect in 1995 and is the company CEO. She is also Co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of the non-profit, BioPharma Research Council (BRC).  She leads teams creating customized internal and external meetings and trade shows for Pharmaceuticals, Telecommunications and AgBio organizations. Past working lives have been spent in labs in Johnson & Johnson, Rutgers Medical School, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, Arthur D. Little, and Ortho Diagnostics and in libraries and marketing at AT&T and Lucent Bell Laboratories. Ronnye is dedicated to working with non-profit organizations, including planning programs and festivals, managing sponsorships and fund-raising for a number of organizations such as the Association of Women in Science (AWIS), American Association of University Women (AAUW), Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and the Jersey Shore Jazz & Blues Foundation (JSJBF).  Ronnye was the Commencement Keynote for DeVry University in 2005 and is a lifetime member of Beta Phi Mu. Ronnye has a Master’s degree from Rutgers University School of Library and Information Studies and a Bachelor of Arts in bacteriology from Douglass College of Rutgers University.

Rebecca Herold

Rebecca Herold, FIP, CISSP, CISA, CISM, CIPT, CIPM, CIPP/US, FLMI, is CEO and Founder of The Privacy Professor® consultancy she established in 2004, and is Co-Founder and President of SIMBUS, LLC, an information security, privacy, technology & compliance management cloud service for organizations of all sizes, in all industries, in all locations founded in 2014. Rebecca is an entrepreneur with over 25 years of systems engineering, information security, privacy and compliance experience. Rebecca has authored 19 books to date, dozens of book chapters, and hundreds of published articles. Rebecca led the NIST SGIP Smart Grid Privacy Subgroup for 7 years, was a founding member and officer for the IEEE P1912 Privacy and Security Architecture for Consumer Wireless Devices Working Group, and serves on the Advisory Boards of numerous organizations. Rebecca also serves as an expert witness for information security, privacy, and compliance issues. Rebecca has helped hundreds of covered entities, business associates, and medical device vendors in the healthcare industry throughout her career, as well as current clients in her SIMBUS360.com business. Rebecca was an Adjunct Professor for the Norwich University MSISA program for many years, and graduated with honors with degrees in Mathematics, Computer Science and Education. Rebecca is based in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mitchell Parker

Mitchell Parker, CISSP, is the Executive Director, Information Security and Compliance, at IU Health in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Mitch is currently working on redeveloping the Information Security program at IU Health, and regularly works with multiple non-technology stakeholders to improve it. He also speaks regularly at multiple conferences and workshops, including HIMSS, IEEE TechIgnite, and Internet of Medical Things. Mitch has a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Bloomsburg University, a MS in Information Technology Leadership from LaSalle University, and his MBA from Temple University.

Steven Abrahamson

Steve Abrahamson is Senior Director of Product Security at GE Healthcare, based in his hometown of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Steve’s leads the GE Healthcare Product Cyber Security organization in development and implementation of the GE Healthcare Design Engineering Privacy and Security process across all global product lines, as well as development of security systems and tools, integration of security within strategic software programs, and development of collaborative approaches with customers, regulators, and industry groups. Steve has promoted systemic risk-based approaches for healthcare security through frequent speaking engagements including the FDA Workshop on Collaborative Approaches for Healthcare Cyber Security, US Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, National Academy of Sciences Innovation Forum, HHS/NIST HIPAA Security Conference, HIMSS, mHealth, Advamed, AAMI, and the SANS Healthcare Cyber Security Summit, and recently served as a chairperson for the Medical Device Cybersecurity Risk Mitigation Conference. Prior to joining GE Steve worked at Texas Instruments in various technical management roles supporting precision-guided weapons programs within their Defense Electronics Group. Steve is a certified Six Sigma Black Belt and Master Black Belt, and has a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Marquette University and a MBA from the University of Dallas. Steve also represents GE as a member of GE’s corporate marathon team, and he has completed over 120 marathons.

Dave Saunders 

Serial tech sector entrepreneur, Dave Saunders has taken over 40 Internet-based products from inception to market since 1991. He has led diverse product development programs including desktop Internet software, access concentration, telco switching, virtual machine clustering and computer-vision-guided surgical tools. An ardent supporter of the Internet of Things, he continues pursuing his vision of a connected world that enriches lives as co-founder and vice president of product development for Silicon Valley-based medical systems creator Galen Robotics.

Katina Michael

Dr Katina Michael, BIT, MTransCrimPrev, PhD, is a Professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology, and member of the Centre for Persuasive Technology and Society, at the University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia. Katina is the Editor in Chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, and Senior Editor of IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine. She researches the technological trajectory of emerging technologies within the national security and biomedical space. Together with husband MG Michael she has developed the concept of uberveillance, denoting embedded surveillance devices. She has guest edited a dozen special issue journals on topics devoted to human activity monitoring and big data. Katina is a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation and previously represented the Consumers Federation of Australia.

Deven McGraw

Deven McGraw serves as the deputy director for health information privacy at the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and is the acting chief privacy officer for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Ms. McGraw is a well-respected expert on the HIPAA rules and brings to her positions a wealth of experience in both the private sector and the non-profit advocacy world. Prior to joining HHS, she was a partner in the healthcare practice of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP.  She previously served as the director of the health privacy projects at the Center for Democracy & Technology, which is a leading consumer voice on health privacy and security policy issues, and as the chief operating officer at the National Partnership for Women & Families, where she provided strategic leadership and substantive policy expertise for the partnership’s health policy agenda. Ms. McGraw graduated magna cum laude from the University of Maryland. She earned her J.D., magna cum laude, and her L.L.M. from Georgetown University Law Center, and was executive editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. She has a Master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.  

Linda Ricci

Linda Ricci began her career developing artificial intelligence solutions in the defense industry before moving to the medical device industry as a software engineer.  She helped to develop several diagnostic cardiology devices and has participated in all phases of product life cycle development.  Ms. Ricci moved to the FDA in 2005 and has had several roles including scientific reviewer and branch chief within the Division of Cardiovascular devices.  Currently Ms. Ricci is the Associate Director for Digital Health within the Office of Device Evaluation.  In this role she, leads the development and implementation of digital health policy within the Office of Device Evaluation.  She has degrees in Electrical Engineering and Medical Engineering.

Tom Fare

Tom is Director, Strategic Alliances for PlanetConnect. His role is to engage potential new clients and customers to develop symposia that address existing and emerging needs within their organizations.  He uses his extensive experience in scientific research, development, and licensing to identify meeting themes matched to a client's objectives and goals.  He also develops ROI models to measure and report on business and employee development for clients and customers.   Tom spent over 13 years with Merck & Co. and over 30 years in biotechnology and technology.  He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Science at the University of Pennsylvania.  He has authored or co-authored peer-reviewed papers in fields ranging from circuit design to gene profiling technologies.

Hacking the Body: The Future of Persuasive Technologies in IOMT

The development of small wearables and tiny implantable devices that are tethered to mobile or desktop units have aided to realise the possibility of the Internet of Medical Things paradigm. This presentation will review the three P’s, pervasive diagnostics, personalised medicine and persuasive technology in the context of an end-to-end healthcare value chain. The future of IOMT is in the collection of discrete historical data and continuous real-time data incorporating not only static data like one’s DNA profile but real-time behavioural biometrics like one’s brain and heart activity. This presentation will emphasise the precautionary principle in considering the impact of IOMT on privacy and security. Notions of secondary use of personal data, retrospective use, bodily privacy, body hacking, and ‘death by Internet’ will be discussed. This presentation will be focused on raising awareness in biomedical device engineers of new end-user vulnerabilities posed by emerging devices within an uberveillance society for individual life sustainment and life enhancement.

Using Social Media in Public Health Research

Katina's Top 10 Social Media Tips

  1. What is ORCID? How do I get an ORCID?
  2. How do I set up a Twitter and LinkedIn account?
  3. Where do I go to setup a Google Scholars account?
  4. What is ResearchGate?
  5. What is Figshare?
  6. What is Selected Works? Also known as Bpress, Research online?
  7. How do I get published on The Conversation? Pitch an idea.
  8. Where can I find my UOW Scholars account?
  9. Is your UOW staff page up to date? How do I add more?
  10. Who is your community of interest (COI) @UoWnursing, and what are your most important themes (# hashtags). E.g. #mentalhealth #nursing #midwifery #agedcare.
Katina Michael addressing School of Nursing at iC UOW. Photo by Dr Moira Stephens

Katina Michael addressing School of Nursing at iC UOW. Photo by Dr Moira Stephens

Symposium on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Emerging Military Technologies

U.S. Relax Body-Modifying Regulation for Personnel Entering the Military: Floodgates Open to Emerging Electronic Tattoos for ID, Exoskeletons, Brain Implants and Beyond

Abstract

US military regulations for the four armed forces has always been very clear about tattoos regarding new personnel entering the ranks or for those already enlisted [[i]]. In short, the mentality has been one of uniformity, the ‘one group’ mantra, that says ‘you are all on the same side, you act as one, and anything different is unacceptable’. But since the new fashion of tattooing has taken root predominantly by Millennials, a subculture has emerged that says “this is my body and I will do with it what I want without your limitations.” It has meant that the US Military in particular given its diversity of citizenry has had to rethink its policies. When 30% of young males eligible to be recruited into the Forces are wearing a tattoo, your pool of prospective personnel is significantly reduced. If your rule of thumb hasn’t kept pace with the trends of the day, then as a military you are forced to make some very drastic changes [[ii]]. The new regulation now states that for the Army, soldiers can now get their arms, legs and most of their bodies covered in tattoos. That is a far cry from the very strict regulations that limited tattoos to where they could be concealed. Face, neck and hand tattoos, however, remain against regulation, with the exception of a ring tattoo in each hand. Additionally, tattoos that are racist or sexist are still outlawed [[iii]]. For a short time, the regulation had been revised, incrementally getting stricter and more specified, to allow soldiers to wear four tattoos below the elbow or knee not bigger than a hand-span but this was difficult to enforce. Still problematic for military recruiters, the US Armed Forces that consist of the Army [[iv]], Marine Corps, Navy [v], Air Force [[vi]] and Coast Guard, have revised their regulations (e.g. see Army Regulation 670 -1) to give soldiers greater freedoms in their appearance.

But these changes may well suit the military with the advent of emerging technologies such as electronic tattoos possibly replacing the century old dog tag introduced in the early 1900s, known as identity discs. There are also exoskeletons in full experimental phases for various military applications that are worn, and even brain implants in their nascent research phase for overcoming post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and memory loss that pierce beneath the skin. Thus, relaxing the regulation for wearing tattoos, now means that the US military is not in breach of its own regulation in instituting trials that require the wearing or even bearing of new emerging technologies. The question is whether or not a soldier who is asked to wear or bear a device that will invariably be interconnected, has a choice to opt-out for a favoured alternative. However, it seems highly unlikely that any form of resistance from soldiers will be acceptable. The response might well be from the military, “if we let you wear tattoos, or bear other types of chips for convenience, then what’s the difference if we tag you with an electronic ID for your own welfare, and possibly ask you to bear a brain implant as well if you need it in the course of duty or as a veteran”? Increasingly, this seems a plausible scenario, despite the doubters who said: “it will never happen”.

L to R: Kobi Leins, Margaret Kosal, Katina Michael in the Bio- and Nanoscience Track chaired by Jai C. Galliot at the "Future of Wars and Public Conscience: Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of Emerging Military Technologies" 29-30 May 2017 at the Law School, University of Melbourne

L to R: Kobi Leins, Margaret Kosal, Katina Michael in the Bio- and Nanoscience Track chaired by Jai C. Galliot at the "Future of Wars and Public Conscience: Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of Emerging Military Technologies" 29-30 May 2017 at the Law School, University of Melbourne

Biography: Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. She is the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine editor-in-chief and also serves as the senior editor of the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine. Since 2008 she has been a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation, and also served as Vice-Chair. She has also completed studies in Transnational Crime Prevention in the Faculty of Law, at the University of Wollongong. She studies the social implications of emerging technologies predominantly within a national security context. Her annual SINS (social implications of national security) workshop began in 2006 under the then ARC-RNSA Research Network for a Secure Australia (Human Factors group). www.katinamichael.com

References

[i] “Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia”, Army Regulation 670–1, http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r670_1.pdf

[ii] David Vergun, March 31, 2014, “Army tightens personal appearance, tattoo policy”, https://www.army.mil/article/122978/Army_tightens_personal_appearance__tattoo_policy

[iii] Staff Report, April 10, 2015, “It's official: Army issues new tattoo rules”, Army Times, http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/careers/army/2015/04/10/army-regs-tattoos-uniforms/25576197/

[iv] Luke Villaplaz, November 4, 2015, “US Army Tattoo Policy 2015: Military Relaxes Rules and Regulations For Army Soldiers”, International Business Times, http://www.ibtimes.com/us-army-tattoo-policy-2015-military-relaxes-rules-regulations-army-soldiers-1878378

[v] Mark D. Faram, March 31, 2016, “The Navy just approved the military's best tattoo rules”, Navy Times, http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/2016/03/31/navy-just-approved-militarys-best-tattoo-rules/82425974/

[vi] Oriana Pawlyk, April 5, 2016,“Air Force to review its tattoo policy”, AirForce Times, http://www.airforcetimes.com/story/military/2016/04/05/air-force-review-its-tattoo-policy/32575947/

Melbourne, 29–30 May 2017, University of Melbourne, PREMT, Future of War

More here

Cyberday @ ASU 2017

Cyber Day Keynote:

Dr. Katina Michaelis a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong

11.45 am - 12.30 pm, 19th May 2017

Title: Privacy of the Mined and the Heart: Hacking the Body With or Without a Warrant

Domestic Panel:

Joe Gervais, Lifelock / Symantec

Caroline Lynch, Owner of Copper Hill Strategies, LLC, previously Chief Counsel of the House Judiciary Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations Subcommittee

James MelendresPartner at Snell & Wilmer

International Panel:

Brad Allenby, President’s Professor, and Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering; Director, Center for Earth Systems Engineering and Management / Arizona State University

Andy GordonFounding Partner of Coppersmith Schermer & Brockelman, PLC. From 2009 through 2010, Counsel, Department of Homeland Security / Arizona State University

Heather RoffCybersecurity Fellow, her research interests pertain to international ethics, security, and emerging military technology, particularly cyber warfare, lethal autonomous weapons, and unmanned systems / Arizona State University

Josephine WolffNew America Cybersecurity Initiative Fellow, Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Computing Security, Rochester Institute of Technology

More here

Columbo (Season 7, Episode 4): “How to Dial a Murder”, Columbo says the murderer:

“You claim that you were at the physicians getting your heart examined… which was true [Colombo unravels a roll of ECG readings)… the electrocardiogram, Sir. Just before 3 o’clock your physician left you alone for a resting trace. At that moment you were lying down in a restful position and your heart showed a calm, slow, easy beat [pointing to the ECG read-out]. Look at this part, right here [Colombo points to the reading], lots of sudden stress, lots of excitement, right here at 3 o’clock, your heart beating like a hammer just before the dogs attacked… Oh you killed him with a phone call, Sir… I’ll bet my life on it. Very simple case. Not that I’m particularly bright, Sir… I must say, I found you disappointing, I mean your incompetence, you left enough clues to sink a ship. Motive. Opportunity. And for a man of your intelligence Sir, you got caught on a lot of stupid lies. A lot.”

Governance of Emerging Technology 2017

The Fifth Annual Conference on Governance of Emerging Technologies: Law, Policy and Ethics held at the new

Beus Center for Law & Society in Phoenix, AZ

May 17-19, 2017

Call for Abstracts – Now Closed

Title: Coming to Grips with Evidence-Based Policing: Body Worn Video Recorders and Beyond

presented by Katina Michael in "Big Data" session at GET Conference

 

Session 5.2 Big Data and the Individual
Room: TBD
Moderator:  Diva Galan, LG Tech-Link Global and Center for Law, Science & Innovation, Arizona State University

  • 5.2.1.  Who Owns “You”?: The Need to Craft a Means of Personal Ownership for One’s Digital Self
    Jeremy Weissman, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Carolina
  • 5.2.2.  The Artificial Revolution: Rethinking the Future of Intellectual Property in a World Without Limits
    Aviv Gaon, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
  • 5.2.3.  Building Responsible Governance Mechanisms for DIY Health
    Eleonore Pauwels, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
  • 5.2.4.  Stakeholder Engagement at the Intersection of Big Data and Criminal Justice
    Kimberly Gardner, School of Public Service, Boise State University

The conference will consist of plenary and session presentations and discussions on regulatory, governance, legal, policy, social and ethical aspects of emerging technologies, including (but not limited to) nanotechnology, synthetic biology, gene editing, biotechnology, genomics, personalized medicine, human enhancement technologies, telecommunications, information technologies, surveillance technologies, geoengineering, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and robotics. The conference is premised on the belief that there is much to be learned and shared from and across the governance experience and proposals for these various emerging technologies.

Some particular themes that will be emphasized at this year’s conference include cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, drones, CRISPR/gene editing, big data, data analytics, transnational coordination, technology unemployment, internet of things, neuroscience, privacy, longevity, bitcoin/blockchain, and digital health.

More here

Please visit http://www.katinamichael.com/sins12/ for the Visual Proceedings of the Social Implications of National Security on POV in Law Enforcement.

Location-based Everything: Are we ready for uberveillance?

Presented by Katina Michael

A sign at a shopping mall that describes the location tracking of smartphones is taking place. Most consumers would not have a clue what this is about. The surveillance is described for the purposes of "enhancing" your shopping experience.

A sign at a shopping mall that describes the location tracking of smartphones is taking place. Most consumers would not have a clue what this is about. The surveillance is described for the purposes of "enhancing" your shopping experience.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017
11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
McCord Hall (MCRD) 164, Tempe campus [map]
Sign up to attend by Monday, May 15, 2017

Want to watch the live stream? Contact Melissa Waite at melissa.waite@asu.edu for details.

ABSTRACT

Location is fundamental to every interaction that happens on earth. Increasingly, the personal and work-related smart devices we use are packed with sensors that record the who (ID), where (location), when (time), and how (mode of transport/condition) of a user’s digital chronicle. Both commercially led initiatives (e.g. objective and subjective mapping of every inch of the globe) and law enforcement motivations (e.g. digital evidence management systems for criminal convictions) have been responsible for generating big data for user convenience and security purposes. This presentation will demonstrate the metadata generated from simple data logging devices, and use scenarios to point to current and future societal implications. While the benefits of these real-time monitoring and tracking capabilities promise to reduce crime rates and make life easier for all, uberveillance will also lead to misinformation, misinterpretation of data, and information manipulation if the commensurate safeguards are not put in place. Policy challenges in the Australian landscape will be discussed with an emphasis on regulation.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Katina Michael is a Professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. Until recently, she was the Associate Dean – International for the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences. She has a BIT (UTS), MTransCrimPrev (UOW), and a PhD (UOW). She previously worked for Nortel Networks as a senior network and business planner until December 2002. Katina is a senior member of the IEEE Society on the Social Implications of Technology where she has edited IEEE Technology and Society Magazine for the last 5+ years, and senior edited IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine for the last 2 years. Katina is an active member of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

The multiple gazes of veillance. Multiple camera recordings corroborating an event. Katina is being surveilled by her student Deniz Gokyer, and another camera further away is surveilling both Deniz and Katina while they chat at UOW. Evidence... evidence... and more evidence...

In 2009 my research team and I used Google Latitude to share our real-time location coordinates. In May 2010, this user "byron ji" is a stranger who has requested I share my location. I obviously did not.

In 2009 my research team and I used Google Latitude to share our real-time location coordinates. In May 2010, this user "byron ji" is a stranger who has requested I share my location. I obviously did not.

Evidence from my gmail account that Google would send me an email about once a month to ensure that I knew I was sharing my location with certain people. Later, due to consumer pressure, this warning email came more often- about once a week. It meant that even if a spouse had covertly downloaded Latitude onto the handset, that the user would receive an alert within a week to say "your location is being shared".

Evidence from my gmail account that Google would send me an email about once a month to ensure that I knew I was sharing my location with certain people. Later, due to consumer pressure, this warning email came more often- about once a week. It meant that even if a spouse had covertly downloaded Latitude onto the handset, that the user would receive an alert within a week to say "your location is being shared".

While Google Latitude is now dead, the feature of Latitude has been incorporated into Google Maps and will be available to all those who download the new updates. For a long while, privacy advocates fought to find out WHAT information Google retained of consumer digital location chronicles. The answer is 'too much'. Around 2010, Google proclaimed they only kept the "last recorded" location of any user. The wording of that response to international NGOs led them to believe that Google was tracking a lot more. It is a well-known fact that if you have wi-fi settings ON on your handset, then Google knows quite accurately where you are at any given point in time.

While Google Latitude is now dead, the feature of Latitude has been incorporated into Google Maps and will be available to all those who download the new updates. For a long while, privacy advocates fought to find out WHAT information Google retained of consumer digital location chronicles. The answer is 'too much'. Around 2010, Google proclaimed they only kept the "last recorded" location of any user. The wording of that response to international NGOs led them to believe that Google was tracking a lot more. It is a well-known fact that if you have wi-fi settings ON on your handset, then Google knows quite accurately where you are at any given point in time.

Since 2008, Ushahidi has developed free and open-source software for information collection, visualisation, and interactive mapping. While Ushahidi were providing a platform for crowdsourcing location and other information, private corporations such as Google have harvested data for profit. The two aims are very different. Above we can see a fleet of Google StreetView cars, fitted with 360 degree cameras. Additionally, there are other recording mediums- Google Trekker on humans or on horseback (as shown above), Google Snowmobiles, and even Google Gondolas. Google has called the international community to get on board with their surveillance of every inch of public space on the Earth's surface. We certainly have the benefit of all of this data in our everyday navigation systems as consumers, but what are the implications of this kind of pervasive view of the world at street level? We have Satellite views, and we are now trying to amass even more than StreetView, to Person View systems.

The SuperTrackstick location data logger. We received ethics approval from the Human Research Ethics Committee at UOW to study the consequences of tracking individuals. Our studies showed the pervasive nature of continuous GPS monitoring. While a data logger such as this is somewhat alarming to be 'attached' to the body, our smartphones have on average about 14 different sensors embedded measuring more than just location. If our settings are on for "location enablement" then most likely we are emitting data to third parties even if we don't realise it. What are some of the implications of behavioural biometrics or human activity monitoring is a very good question.

The SuperTrackstick location data logger. We received ethics approval from the Human Research Ethics Committee at UOW to study the consequences of tracking individuals. Our studies showed the pervasive nature of continuous GPS monitoring. While a data logger such as this is somewhat alarming to be 'attached' to the body, our smartphones have on average about 14 different sensors embedded measuring more than just location. If our settings are on for "location enablement" then most likely we are emitting data to third parties even if we don't realise it. What are some of the implications of behavioural biometrics or human activity monitoring is a very good question.