RNSA - Human Factors Series

In 2005 I went to Canberra for a 2 day workshop held at the Australian National University for researchers that were interested in "Securing Australia's Borders". The event was well-represented by a diverse list of stakeholders from all over Australia. Somehow, I ended up sitting on a table full of Defence Science Technology Organisation (DSTO) staff where I exchanged some thoughts about national security, modelling, risk and more. The staff who have since remained in contact with me encouraged me to explore the interplay between new technologies, security, and society.

At the conclusion of the event one of the Research Network leaders gave a 15 minute presentation on how the Network was especially looking to target and encourage early career researchers (ECRs) and that if anyone had an idea for research they could put it forward for consideration. Well, I went home that weekend and drafted a proposal for a workshop series on one of the four main themes: human factors. We gained significant funding for events held between 2006-2011, under the specific workshop entitled: "The Social Implications of National Security". The workshop still runs annually... and the rest as they say is history.

Professor Priyan Mendis of the University of Melbourne was a wonderful mentor during these early years when I was trying to find my feet as a researcher. Indebted to him for his guidance.

Although the site now has broken links, some of the remnants of the RNSA community live on here.

The Research Network for a Secure Australia (RNSA) is a multi-disciplinary collaboration established to strengthen Australia's research capacity to enhance the protection of the nation’s critical infrastructure from natural, human-caused, or accidental disasters, and terrorist acts.
The RNSA has received ARC funding to achieve its goals of establishing a research network primarily under the National Research Priority 4 – Safeguarding Australia: Priority Goal 1 – Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP); and including some elements from other national priority areas such as frontier technologies, advanced materials, smart information use, transformational defence technologies, and protecting Australia from terrorism and crime.
The RNSA seeks to bring together the majority of Australia’s leading researchers, government and industry leaders involved in CIP.
The RNSA will facilitate a knowledge-sharing network for research organisations, government and the private sector to develop research tools and methods to mitigate emerging safety and security issues relating to critical infrastructure. The network will integrate complementary, yet diverse research areas including physical and information infrastructure security, and surveillance and intelligent systems.
The Australian government has identified the need to secure critical infrastructure against potential natural or human-caused disasters including terrorism as a national priority. The RNSA is designed to meet this important government requirement through providing research coordination in the areas of critical infrastructure protection (CIP). The network receives strong support from key government organisations responsible for critical infrastructure protection and counter-terrorism such as the Critical Infrastructure Advisory Council (CIAC), the Attorney-General's Department, Trusted Information Sharing Network (TISN) for Critical Infrastructure Protection, the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet – National Security Division (SET Unit) and Emergency Management Australia (EMA).
The Research Network for a Secure Australia (RNSA) is a multi-disciplinary collaboration established to strengthen Australia's research capacity to enhance the protection of the nation’s critical infrastructure from natural, human-caused, or accidental disasters, and terrorist acts.
The RNSA has received ARC funding to achieve its goals of establishing a research network primarily under the National Research Priority 4 – Safeguarding Australia: Priority Goal 1 – Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP); and including some elements from other national priority areas such as frontier technologies, advanced materials, smart information use, transformational defence technologies, and protecting Australia from terrorism and crime.
The RNSA seeks to bring together the majority of Australia’s leading researchers, government and industry leaders involved in CIP.
The RNSA will facilitate a knowledge-sharing network for research organisations, government and the private sector to develop research tools and methods to mitigate emerging safety and security issues relating to critical infrastructure. The network will integrate complementary, yet diverse research areas including physical and information infrastructure security, and surveillance and intelligent systems.
The Australian government has identified the need to secure critical infrastructure against potential natural or human-caused disasters including terrorism as a national priority. The RNSA is designed to meet this important government requirement through providing research coordination in the areas of critical infrastructure protection (CIP). The network receives strong support from key government organisations responsible for critical infrastructure protection and counter-terrorism such as the Critical Infrastructure Advisory Council (CIAC), the Attorney-General's Department, Trusted Information Sharing Network (TISN) for Critical Infrastructure Protection, the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet – National Security Division (SET Unit)and Emergency Management Australia (EMA)..
Objectives
  1. Open exchange of information and sharing of resources across disciplinary, organisational, institutional and geographical boundaries by organising workshops, focus groups and an annual conference.
  2. Development and implementation of cohesive and integrated research plans among researchers by bringing them together and encouraging communication opportunities for cross-disciplinary research collaboration.
  3. Nurturing the careers of young investigators and research students through incentives, such as attending an annual summer retreat, as well as opportunities to participate in international and inter-institutional exchange programs.
  4. Links with actual and potential end-users, and the broader community through an advisory board composed of recognised key stakeholders in Australian CIP.