Impacts: At the intersection between the worlds of consumer electronics and socioeconomics

Editor's Introduction

In our last issue, i wrote about how we'd planned to expand the scope and audience of IEEE Consumer Electronics (CE) Magazine. After all, CE is not just about the design and manufacture of electronic systems and products. These devices and their ecosystems have been changing and altering our lives since the introduction of the TV set in the 1950s and 1960s.

But in today's Internet age, we are so interconnected that society and the economy respond at a much accelerated pace. Changes and disruption that would have taken years, or even decades, back in the 1960s and 1970s can now spread in months or even weeks. And today, their impacts are felt on a global scale, and not just in the developed world, but increasingly among those in the developing world.

As engineers, we are the electronic architects of tomorrow, but the scope and scale of impact that our designs and architectures can have on society and on the economy place significant responsibility on our shoulders. We are all responsible for broadening our perspectives and considering how our work might impact the lives of others. There is much for us to learn beyond the realms of pure science and engineering.

This section of our magazine, aptly titled “Impacts,” is being introduced to help facilitate a broadening of our perspective on the world of CE and to learn more of the various impacts of CE on society. It is introduced in partnership with the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology (SSIT). Starting with this issue, SSIT members will also be receiving a copy of IEEE CE Magazine, increasing our distribution to IEEE Members in other Societies.

I would like to express a big thank you first to Stefan Mozar, president of the IEEE CE Society, for initiating this collaboration with SSIT and second to Katina Michael, the editor-in-chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, for working with me to put together this first “Impacts ” section.

This is a first attempt, but I think it is a pretty good start—at the same time, I'd much rather hear what some of you think. So please feel free to contact either me or Katina to give your feedback. And we'd welcome suggestions for topics or subject areas that should be addressed in future editions of “Impacts.”

Now a short introduction to our partners on “Impacts ”—the SSIT.

—Peter Corcoran

 

Introduction to the IEEE SSIT (Katina Michael)

CE has revolutionized the way we live and work. Most students that I know would rather forgo expensive clothing labels than do without their branded smartphone. In fact, some of them would forgo food altogether if it meant their phone could always be on and always with them, clipped onto their belt buckles, strapped into their pants or jacket sleeves, or held in the open palm of their hand. Something happens when our basic needs as humans are overtaken by some other need that was once a distant want at best—plainly, confusion in our ability to rightly determine what our priorities are as humans in any given context.

I have been around people who have lost or had their iPad or iPhone stolen. It is not a pretty sight to see a grown man or woman become frantic and then be reduced to tears over the loss of what is seemingly an inanimate object but in reality has become seamlessly integrated to every aspect of one's life. And lest I look all high and mighty, I had my own laptop stolen with invaluable unbacked Ph.D. research onboard, while working for Nortel Networks and visiting company headquarters in 1999. It took me months to recover from the ordeal, professionally, academically, and even mentally.

The SSIT, with its flagship magazine, IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, explores not only the obvious trends toward CE but those aspects that are not given enough attention on the externality spectrum of potential issues—the threat of ever-increasing screen time for children at school and at home, the use of violent video games, and exposure to different types of online media to everyday consumers, consider even the wide ranging topics that go into supporting the development of such an innovation, tracking its existence from conception to the end of its product lifetime.

Taking the smartphone analogy further, as a typical CE device that affects the global population and that has now saturated the consumer market, SSIT would consider everything from the sustainable design of mobile phones to further investigation of the smartphone's posited harmful effects through the emission of electromagneticfields or the potential to do damage to the wearer's inner ear if played on a high volume daily. The Society would also be interested in submissions on the manner of operational health and safety obligations and conditions of companies during the assemblage of the CE components into the finished product in developing nations. The privacy and security of the data on the smartphone would be an area of interest, as would the ability to dispose of the device without producing ever-increasing e-waste mobile phone dumping grounds with hazardous materials thrown into a landfill.

But that is not all. SSIT's greatest focus is perhaps the economic, institutional, and organization infrastructure surrounding CE products. Aspects of this include how developing countries are adopting CE and their impact on equity and access to information toward international development out of the poverty cycle, the ability to offer remote health care and better access to health information services, the importance of public policy surrounding telecommunications in general, and the laws, standards, and regulations in existence to facilitate use, at the same time protecting the consumer. Herein, it is important to weigh the benefits of CE such as the smartphone—on the one hand, providing life-saving capabilities such as access to emergency services, as opposed to the potential to cyberstalk a stranger using mobile social media or even gather location data from a friend's phone to be used surreptitiously at a later date. Equally, we are interested in articles addressing functionality, such as the ability for human activity and condition monitoring from the dozen or so sensors in the smartphone, as well as the basic traditional applications of call patterns, texting, and usage patterns, with respect to communities of practice online. How might these communities be changing the dynamics between state and society both now and into the future?

One thing for certain is that IEEE SSIT shares some fundamental qualities with the IEEE CE Society—that it is one of the most interdisciplinary Societies within the IEEE, and membership spans across disciplines, with a wide spectrum of interests represented. We are actively seeking papers that tackle the social, environmental, economic, political, and ethical impacts of CE on households, businesses, and governments and how the application of such technology can improve the world around us but also how it may adversely affect the very users it was created to aid.

IEEE SSIT hosts the annual conference, the International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS), and, in 2013, the focus was wearable technologies, while in 2014, the focus will be on ethics and technology. The Society also supports and recognizes engineering ethics, presenting the Carl Barus Award for Outstanding Service in the Public Interest. With active international Chapters all over the world, IEEE SSIT provides a voice for topics that would otherwise not be addressed from all sides of the debate. It is this open discussion that makes IEEE SSIT and IEEE CE such vital Societies as we continue with the explosion of emerging technologies in all aspects of our home and work life. CE affects everybody—from the newborn baby, to the employee, to the elderly. Viewpoints and cutting-edge pieces on all these perspectives are not only welcome but highly valued.

IEEE Keywords: Social factors, Consumer electronics, Sociology, Economics, Media, Mobile handsets, Ethics, Design manufacturing

Citation: Peter Corcoran and Katina Michael, "Impacts: At the intersection between the worlds of consumer electronics and socioeconomics", IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine, Volume: 3, Issue: 3, July 2014, pp. 57 - 58, Date of Publication: 26 June 2014, DOI: 10.1109/MCE.2014.2317897

 

Securing the Cloud (book review)

Securing the Cloud: Cloud Computer Security Techniques and Tactics

    With so much buzz around Cloud Computing, books like this one written by Winkler are much in demand. Winkler's experience in the computing business shines through and as readers we are spoiled with a great deal of useful strategic information – a jam packed almost 300 page volume on securing the cloud.

    Winkler, presently a senior associate at Booz Allen Hamilton has had more than 30 years of experience servicing U.S. Government clients, and as Chief Technologist for Security for the Sun Microsystems Public Cloud, in applications engineering, and IT operations and management in a number of organizations. Winkler has numerous technical conference publications, and among his many achievements, he was a visiting cyber security expert authoring the Information Security policy for the Government of Malaysia.

    The book begins with a well-needed introduction for those who are new to cloud computing. Winkler describes how the cloud works, the importance of securing the cloud, and its fundamental architecture.

    Chapter 2 goes into greater detail on the cloud reference architecture, introducing cloud service and deployment models and differentiating between public, private, community and hybrid clouds, and the cloud software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS) and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) models.

    To be commended, before entering an in-depth discussion on how to architecture a secure cloud, Winkler spends chapter 3 discussing security concerns, risk issues, and legal aspects. As a privacy specialist myself, it is very heartening to see that Winkler addresses those very difficult questions that every client asks about privacy and confidentiality concerns, data ownership and locale concerns, and other aspects like emerging threats, third parties, data privacy and litigation.

    Chapters 4–6 are all about ways in which we can secure the cloud – the underlying architecture, data security, and key strategies and best practices. These chapters are at the heart of the book as we are taken on a guided tour about standards and policies, honeypots, sandboxes, network and cabling patterns and the like. For the important area of data security within the cloud we are introduced to the idea of control over data and public cloud economics, ownership and custodianship, data encryption and its limitations, and access control techniques for data categorization. The deletion of data within the cloud is also discussed, something that is becoming vital from the lessons learnt in the social media environment. Key strategies and best practices in securing the cloud are presented in chapter 6 from first principals. NIST definitions are given in security controls and unclassified and classified models are compared. Security monitoring by the CIA is addressed and the emphasis is placed on reliable streams of data – a notion introduced as MaaS – Monitoring as a Service.

    Chapter 7 and 8 look at security criteria with respect to building an internal cloud (i.e. private cloud) versus selecting an external cloud provider. The internal cloud choice is based on the security implications offset between a shared versus dedicated resources solution. Criteria for ensuring a secure private cloud include: network considerations, data center considerations, operational security considerations, and regulation. For the selection of an external cloud provider a discussion is given on assurance and how to verify independently the claims made by a given vendor.

    Chapter 9 is about evaluating your cloud security using an information security framework. Checklists are provided to help cloud personnel evaluate the stealth of their given solution, including a manner for placing metrics against the checklists.

    Chapter 10 is about operating a cloud and is very much intended for the manager who is in charge of the business case toward a cloud solution. Processes, efficiency and cost are all covered aspects as well as security operations activities that typically are related to business continuity and recovery.

    As a former pre-sales engineer, what I loved most about this book was the obvious hands-on strategic and technical experience that Winkler bought to every aspect of it. It is really a practitioner's guide to cloud computing security. I appreciated the descriptive figures, the tips, the warnings, the notes, the tools, the stories of failures and successes but most of all the comprehensive nature of the real world descriptions.

    Citation: Katina Michael, [Book Review] "Securing the Cloud: Cloud Computer Security Techniques and Tactics" by Vic (J.R.) Winkler. Computers & Security,  Vol. 31, No. 4, June 2012, Page 633, Syngress|Elsevier, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cose.2012.03.006