Your credit history could soon be up for sale

Abstract

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While marketing executives may be excited by the prospect of more highly-targeted campaigns, the issue has provoked the ire of civil libertarians and privacy advocates. "On-selling consumer data without their consent is illegal," Australian Privacy Foundation board member Katina Michael told ninemsn. Dr Michael said that when consumers enter into agreements to use credit cards they are not consenting to their personal details being on-sold to third parties. She added that consumers are becoming increasingly concerned that their data is traded by third parties and many are demanding that their personal information be stored in a secure manner and not passed on.

Keywords: credit card, Mastercard, consent, privacy, onsell, terms and conditions

Citation: Martin A Zavan and Katina Michael. "Your credit history could soon be up for sale" ninemsn.com.au | Finance (2011) Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/240/

New Editor for T&S Magazine

Associate Professor Katina Michael of the University of Wollongong, Wollongong, N.S.W., Australia, has been appointed by the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology (SSIT) to be the new Editor of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

Prof. Michael will begin as Editor-in-Chief with the Spring 2012 issue of T&S. Long-time T&S Magazine Editor Keith Miller of the University of Illinois-Springfield will step down after the Winter (Dec.) 2011 issue after an accomplished and award winning tenure.

Prof. Michael has been an Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong, School of Information Systems and Technology since 2002. She co-chaired the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS’10), held in Wollongong, Australia, and is the Co-Guest Editor of the current (Fall 2011) Special Issue of T&S Magazine, featuring articles from that conference. Previously, in Summer 2010, Prof. Michael co-guest-edited a special section of T&S Magazine on “Uberveillance.”

Prof. Michael’s research has been predominantly in the area of emerging technologies, with secondary interests in technologies used for national security and their corresponding social implications. Before her affiliation with the University of Wollongong, she worked as a Senior Network Engineer at Nortel Networks and earlier as a Systems Analyst at Andersen Consulting and at Otis Elevator Company.

Prof. Michael has published several edited books, and she recently co-authored a 500-page reference volume: Innovative Automatic Identification and Location Based Services: from Bar Codes to Chip Implants (Hershey, PA: IGI, 2009). She has published over 85 peer reviewed papers. Prof. Michael can be reached at University of Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia; Email: katina@uow.edu.au

Citation: T&S Staff, September 12, 2011, "New editor for T&S Magazine", IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, Vol. 30, No. 3, p. 4, Fall 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6017260/

Katina Michael takes helm of tech magazine

Katina Michael takes helm of tech magazine

As an academic and member of several industry boards, Associate Professor Katina Michael’s kitchen calendar is already brimming with deadlines and engagements. The schedule is now set to become even busier for the mother of three as she begins an exciting new role as Editor-in-Chief of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Technology and Society Magazine.

Professor Michael, who is part of UOW’s School of Information Systems and Technology (SISAT), will take the reigns at the respected publication for the next two years.

“I really am excited about the appointment, especially given I never thought such an opportunity would come my way as early as it did in my academic career,” she said.

“I hope to build on the solid foundations of my immediate predecessors Professor Keith Miller and Professor Joseph Herkert. One of my research interests is the trajectory of future technologies and their social implications so I hope as Editor-in-Chief I will be able to make that even more prevalent in the magazine.”

Professor Michael said while the magazine received many submissions from engineers, she hoped to introduce more interdisciplinary content from philosophers, sociologists, science and media studies commentators as well as business, ethics and legal experts.

“I am also very keen to invite well-known inventors and futurists to write for the magazine,” she said.

As Technical Editor of the Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronics Commerce Research and a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation and Computers and Security Journal, Professor Michael said time management had proved an important skill.

“I am acutely aware of deadlines, write a daily to do list and keep a monthly calendar in the kitchen to keep track of the activities of family, friends and my work,” she said.

“In fact most, of my thinking about the day ahead begins when I am preparing to make the children’s breakfast. The key to fitting everything in is being flexible and willing to compromise dependent on the pressures at play on any given day,” she said.

Professor Michael credited her success to the quality of UOW’s research structure, her colleagues and mentors, the young researchers she had supervised throughout her career, her family and husband and research collaborator Dr MG Michael.

Faculty of Informatics Dean Professor Phillip Ogunbona said Professor Michael’s appointment was a testament to her good work and visibility at an international level.

“Katina brings a lot of passion and energy to her work and is well regarded in her research community. I am really excited and proud that she has been appointed to such a rigorous and highly regarded publication,” he said.

Citation: Jenna Bradwell, August 2, 2011, "Katina Michael takes helm of tech magazine", UOW Media, https://media.uow.edu.au/news/UOW107279.html

What Could Microchips in Humans be Used for?

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Citation: Katina Michael with Katherine Albrecht, July 30, 2011, "What could microchips in humans be used for?" The Katherine Albrecht Show: Talk Radio with a Freedom Twist.

Note: I conducted this interview from Wollongong Hospital. Our line was cut several times as there was poor mobile reception in the ward. Only 10 minutes were captured. Here is the interview without commercials.

Überveillance makes it into a suspense thriller!

Überveillance makes it into a suspense thriller!

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The word, “überveillance”, invented by UOW researchers has now made it into a novel -- Sam Yarney’s suspense thriller novel, The Banjo Player.

Pronounced oohbuhvayluhns, it was coined in 2006 by former UOW Honorary Senior Fellow with the School of Information Systems and Technology (SISAT), Dr M.G. Michael. The concept was further developed together with Associate Professor Katina Michael from SISAT.

The first time the term was used by Dr Michael was in a guest lecture he delivered on the “Consequences of Innovation”.

He and Professor Michael had been researching the trajectory of ‘beneath-the-skin’ surveillance technologies that could identify and locate individuals.

The duo said the word simply ‘came out’ in a moment of inspiration, when Michael was searching for words to describe the embedded technologies. They said the term “surveillance” didn’t describe the full extent of the technological capabilities available today.

“Michael could find no other term but to bring together the German prefix “über” with the French root word “veiller” to describe the exaggerated surveillance conducted by governments in the name of national security,” Professor Katina Michael said.

The Kindle edition of The Banjo Player and hardcover version has the following jacket cover verbatim. It reads:

“A Wall Street banker cashes-in on his considerable investments ahead of a global financial crisis, which few saw coming. Within a few months he has given away most of his fortune and moved to a sleepy seaside town in West Africa, leading a simple life. A few years later, he dies in what appears to be an innocuous boating accident. But is his death connected to things happening several thousand miles away?

The Banjo Player thrusts you into the volatile place where big oil, the environment, political ambition, big money, espionage and cyberspace collide. Will the tectonic plates of things as we know them shift forever? 

In a world where any sense of individualism is steadily being eroded in an inexorable drift towards Überveillance – is there a place for ‘the little guy,'? ”

We obtained a copy of the book in December and low and behold after reading it we see the importance of überveillance in the plot. The key page in the book is page 227 where überveillance is described (as we have formally defined it in our research) and where another term is used in the book by the author- “Super Überveillance” which is abbreviated as “Soober”. Amazingly, the novel is dedicated to “All you SÜbers out there.”
— MG Michael on Sam Yarney's "The Banjo Player"

In the last 12 months “überveillance” has gone from strength to strength, including papers in the June 2010 special issue on “surveillance and überveillance” in the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, and in September 2010 a paper was dedicated to the theme of the überveillance in a special issue on “RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) Innovation published by the Proceedings of the IEEE”.

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Citation: Bernie Goldie, January 4, 2011, "Überveillance makes it into a suspense thriller!", UOW Mediahttps://media.uow.edu.au/news/UOW093662.html