National Security Risks Associated with the Strava App

The Strava App story seems to have mesmerised readers worldwide. Understandably so. People as sensors is a concept that has gathered momentum in the fields of location-based services, social media and crowdsourcing applications. In 2003, I recognised the potential of GPS/GIS and ran a study titled Spatial Database National Australian (S-DNA) that was funded by the University of Wollongong. Here are some of the first outcomes of the work, that later grew to be funded by the Australian Research Council as a Discovery Project:

Source: https://gadgets.ndtv.com/apps/news/australian-military-says-strava-tracking-app-doesnt-breach-security-1806287

Emerging Technologies: In The Loop Gong

We sat down with bright mind professor Katina Michael to talk about her research into emerging technologies like wearable tech, nanotechnology, and biohacking.

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Biohacking - In the Loop

Love our local "In the Loop" program which is going from strength to strength. What a great place Wollongong is!

Published on 29 Aug 2017

This month Lachy meets some comedians and vampires at the Anywhere Theatre Festival. Greg Ellis chats with Illawarra Steelers legend Brett Rodwell. Marty has a go at beach fishing with Guided Beach Fishing Illawarra. Katina Michael teaches us about implantables and other emerging technologies. Our Innovative Business is Wollongong born start-up Binary Beer & Christie takes Crammy & Brittany from i98FM on a winery tour thanks to Foodscape tours.

In This Months Episode

Adventure and Play - http://guidedbeachfishing.com.au/
Eat & Drink - Foodscape Tours - http://foodscapetours.com.au/
Berry Chocolatier - https://www.facebook.com/berrychocola...
Silos Estate - http://silosestate.com/
Camberwarra Estate - http://www.cambewarraestate.com.au/
Coolangatta Estate - http://www.coolangattaestate.com.au/
Two Figs Winery - http://twofigs.com.au/
Binary Beer - http://www.binarybeer.io/
Anywhere Theatre Festival - http://anywheretheatre.com/

You can stay in the loop with us on:
Our Website - http://intheloop.tv
Facebook: https://facebook.com/intheloopgong
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intheloopgong
Instagram: https://instagram.com/intheloopgong

Media partners:
i98fm - http://i98fm.com.au

Segment sponsors:
Wollongong Central - http://www.wollongongcentral.com.au
University of Wollongong - http://www.uow.edu.au
Access Law Group - http://www.accesslawgroup.com.au
The Illawarra Mercury - http://www.illawarramercury.com.au
Advantage Wollongong - http://www.advantagewollongong.com.au
Destination Wollongong - http://visitwollongong.com.au
Internetrix - http://www.internetrix.com.au
Relativity Films - http://relativity.com.au
Lancaster Law & Mediation - http://lancasterlaw.com.au
Kaizen Business & Financial - http://www.kaizenbf.com.au


Promotional Partners:
Illawarra Hawks - http://www.hawks.com.au
Digital Print Bureau - http://digitalprintbureau.com.au
Illawarra Women In Business - http://www.iwib.com.au
Novotel Northbeach - http://novotelnorthbeach.com.au
Dee Kramer Photography - http://www.deekramer.com
St George Illawarra Dragons - http://www.dragons.com.au

intheloop.png

NFC Innovation Award

NFC Industry, Customer Experience and Product Design Leaders Share 2017 Outlook and Predictions on NFC Technology

Transport, IoT, wearables, cloud-based services experts from across the NFC technology sector – all judges for the new NFC Forum Innovations Awards — anticipate the NFC tech trends that will define 2017

As the entry process for the NFC Forum Innovation Awards gathers pace, we asked the experts on our Judging Panel to anticipate the NFC tech trends that will define 2017. The prestigious list of judges features a host of well-known names from across the NFC technology sector. This week we hear from: Dr. Katina Michael, IEEE and the University of Wollongong; Paul Gosden, Terminal Director, GSMA and Randy Vanderhoof, Executive Director, Smart Card Alliance.
NFC Forum Innovation Awards

We queried the esteemed panel of 9 judges about NFC innovation and what NFC trends they see happening in 2017. We will be sharing their responses over the next few weeks leading up to the entry deadline for the NFC Forum Innovation Awards. Companies and developers using NFC in new, disruptive and innovative ways are invited to submit award entries showcasing their work for the chance to win in one of three award categories. Semi-finalists will be invited to the NFC Innovation Awards Reception on March 14, 2017, in Las Vegas, which is co-located with the NFC Forum’s Members Meeting. Finalists receive two nights paid hotel room in Las Vegas, award trophy, global recognition and networking opportunities. There is no cost to enter and the deadline for award submissions is January 11, 2017.

Question: What NFC trend or new opportunity will ramp-up or emerge in 2017?

In 2017, we will see a great deal of experimentation continuing in the space of NFC-based humancentric applications. These opportunities will especially take the form of wearables and bearables for identity, physical access control, financial transactions, and even niche applications like prisoner verification systems that are NFC-enabled. Certainly, we are at the point where convergence in technology will mean NFC will be a part of just about any innovation that requires human to machine interaction (e.g. gaming) or even machine to machine interaction (e.g. supply chain). The underlying premise for the use of NFC is the “convenience” value proposition, which has the direct effect of increased usage.

Dr. Katina Michael is a senior member of the IEEE and is on the board for the IEEE Council on RFID. She is also the Associate Dean International at the University Of Wollongong, Australia

More here

The Apple Watch and Wearable Downsides

We are witnessing an explosion of wearable devices. People are now seen wearing a watch, a FITBIT and carrying their mobile phone. What next? Do away with all these externals and just go for an implantable that can do all of this for the price of one and is invisible? Not only are these wearables a status symbol but people truly believe they can gain many benefits from reminders to do with getting up and walking when they've been sitting all day behind a computer at work. No one can discount the potential benefits but there are also downsides. What if we lived in a future where our health insurance providers could dictate our premium based on the number of steps we took each day? What if our future employer could make a decision on whether we'd be a good employee based on our data, sold on from App companies to third parties? Don't think we will ever live in such a future? Think again-- it's already here! We just seem to be too busy to realise because we're looking for the latest gadget that will make us more hip and ultimately chew up more of our scarce time. We're too busy interacting and messaging too notice what is going on right before our very eyes. Jack and Candice explore the issues at hand in this interview.

Citation: Powerfm and Katina Michael, May 25, 2015, "The Apple Watch and Wearable Downsides" 94.9 Powerfm: 8.50am-8.56am.

The new way to pay with Smartwatches

Information systems and technology associate professor Katina Michael is worried about paying with wearables and other emerging contactless devices.

The University of Wollongong academic voiced her concerns at FST Media’s recent Future of Security in Financial Services Summit.

Michael said “lax security” of some contactless payment methods, for example, made it easier for juveniles to swipe $100 “from a parent’s card without their knowledge.”

Even when a second factor for authentication was introduced, it did not mask the underlying weakness of these newer platforms, she said.

“What are we doing introducing insecure technologies like NFC [near field communications] and ‘touch and go’ [payments] through different types of wearables and card tokens and then trying to back them up with some kind of second tier authentication like biometrics?” she said.

((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.m2.com on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com)).

Citation: M2, March 18, 2015, "The new way to pay with Smartwatches", M2 Presswire.

Dashcams Used to Gather Evidence of Adverse Driver Behaviour: Police Encourage Reporting by Citizen

dashcams.jpg

Dashcams are proliferating. In some states of Australia, more than 10% of vehicles are fitted with this technology, and about 50% more want it. There has been a boom of followers of dashcam data, one Facebook site has about 200K members. Police in some states are encouraging people to store data that might be used toward prosecuting those involved in adverse driving behaviour, while in other states like Victoria, police are more circumspect about the use of dashcams and body-worn video recorders. Cameras can have an equiveillance effect, power by police is countered by citizen power through crowdsourced sousveillance. Yet, while footage might have been recorded, it is not always readily available given records management cycles and the like. It becomes particularly unappealing when law enforcement do not hand over important data on its officers, and the whole purpose of data retention comes into question. Complaints against officers have allegedly decreased as a result of body worn video recorders used by police forces, and evidence for the "use of force" by police have been supported by camera evidence. However, visual data is not unbiased as most would have it believe. It is contextual and like any data it can be used to misrepresent cases.

Tim Holt and Katina Michael. January 31, 2015, "Dashcams Used to Gather Evidence of Adverse Driver Behaviour: Police Encourage Reporting by Citizens" ABC South East NSW Radio: Mornings with Tim Holt (2015), Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/516/

The Technological Trajectory: From Wearables to Implantables

Key Link

Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong
Katherine AlbrechtCASPIAN

Abstract

wearables.jpg

We've seen waves of automatic identification innovation since the 1960s. First bar codes changed the face of the supermarket checkout, then magnetic-stripe cards changed banking, smart cards made a debut for telecommunications and much more in Europe especially, then biometrics for electronic benefits schemes and other government-to-citizen transactions, and the finally contactless cards and microchip implants for the identification of bovine, swine and fish. While the selection environment of these technologies continues to increase, integration and convergence of infrastructure and various auto-ID techniques is rapidly occurring. What does this mean for citizens in every day life? Will predictive analytics be used to manipulate our purchasing behaviours or decision making capacities? This discussion addresses matters to do with free will, autonomy, the right to be left alone, and human rights and dignity. It also maintains that the more time we give over to devices that we wear, the harder it will be to loose the shackles from the technology grip. Katina calls this high-tech lust. It is a type of addiction. How do we get back our work-life balance? In the busy world of instant communications how do we leave some time for the self to develop privately through meditation and other activities that bring us not closer to technology, but closer to each other as people.

Suggested Citation: Katina Michael and Katherine Albrecht. "The Technological Trajectory: From Wearables to Implantables" Katherine Albrecht: Talk Radio with a Freedom Twist Jul. 2013.

Living In A Smart World

Key Link

Authors

Author: Tiffany Hoy, Editor: Wang Yuanyuan, Global Times - Xinhua China
Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong

Abstract

As "smart" devices continue to advance, government regulation is lagging far behind, leaving citizens vulnerable to giving away their private information without their knowledge, said Katina Michael, vice chair of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

People sometimes don't even know what embedded sensors are in the devices that they're carrying, Michael said, but the information that they record can be pieced together to create a frightening surveillance profile. "There are many social implications if I know your whereabouts 24 x 7. I can track your location history, for example -- I know exactly where you were on the Earth's surface, I know how fast you were traveling which tells me your mode of transport, if any, and I'm probably able to infer what you were doing," said Michael.

"If I know through the devices that you're carrying: who you are -- through your ID, where you are -- through GPS or wifi enablement, when you were there -- through a timestamp, and what you were doing -- through the visual imagery you are taking photos or records of, then we pretty much know what is actually in your mind," she added.

Moving towards a more transparent society, where mobile recording devices can be used to capture what's happening at any given time -- with life-bloggers recording every waking moment through autography devices, and police use dashboard cameras and headsets to record video later used as evidence in court, also comes with a trade-off: the erosion of personal privacy.

"There's an asymmetry involved here. The wearer of these wearable devices is always a more powerful constituent in this relationship. Those individuals who choose not to be a part of this new information society may find themselves on the wrong side of any particular imbalance," Michael said. "The asymmetry gets greater and greater as the number of devices grow, (between) those that have wearables and those who don't, and those who don't wish to participate and live off-grid. "Yes we understand that once we step out our front door we can' t expect privacy. But private things can be gathered, such as the clothes that we wear, the places that we frequent, if I want to go to a religious building on a weekend ... I should have an expectation of privacy and there should not be recordings of me going about my everyday life," she added.

Suggested Citation

Global Times - Xinhua China and Katina Michael. "Living in a smart world" Global Times Jun. 2013.

TEDxUWollongong: The Social Implications of Microchipping People

A/Professor Katina Michael from the University of Wollongong, speaks at the 2012 TEDxUWollongong on the moral and ethical dilemmas of emerging technologies. The 3 scenarios she performs raise very interesting social implications for our humanity. http://www.tedxuwollongong.com  

Speaker playlist here

Photostream available here

Glogging Your Every Move

Key Link

Authors

Lisa WachsmuthIllawarra Mercury
Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong

Article comments

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/956192/glogging-your-every-move/?src=rss

Abstract

"It is one thing to lug technologies around, another thing to wear them, and even more intrusive to bear them... But that's the direction in which we're headed."

"I think we're entering an era of person-view systems which will show things on ground level and will be increasingly relayed to others via social media.

"We've got people wearing recording devices on their fingers, in their caps or sunglasses - there are huge legal and ethical implications here."

Suggested Citation

Lisa Wachsmuth and Katina Michael. "Glogging Your Every Move" Illawarra Mercury: News Nov. 2012: 10. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/298

Full article in text here:

YOU wake up, it's a hot day so you put on your smart clothes that keep you cool; you lace up your smart shoes which track your movements while every moment of your day is recorded via an implant in your eyeball.

Sounds like science fiction but the technology is already available and it won't be long before body wearable - and implantable - technologies are ever present, according to a University of Wollongong academic.

Associate Professor Katina Michael said people were already comfortable "wearing" devices like pedometers and iPods - and there were even a number of "voluntary microchip implantees" including Australians.

"It is one thing to lug technologies around, another thing to wear them, and even more intrusive to bear them," she said. "But that's the direction in which we're headed."

Emerging body-wearable technologies were becoming more sophisticated and less visible, said Prof Michael, who will host an IEEE International Symposium of Technology and Society in Canada next year.

"You already see people running around with iPod pockets around their arms, or with a heart-rate monitor on at the gym," she said.

"Over the next few years these devices will become less obvious and more integrated with our clothing and accessories. We'll be wearing smart necklaces and earrings, smart glasses and headbands, smart shoes and belt buckles.

"These smart devices will make 'augmented reality' a part of our daily lives; we'll be able to take photos and video, to collect geographical data about where we've been and physiological data such as our heart rate."

A lot of this technology is already in use - extreme sports people wear cameras with built-in GPS; police officers use special sunglasses to record situations and location-based shoes monitor people with dementia.

"Most of these devices were developed for the military and are now enjoying popularity as commercial devices," Prof Michael said.

She collaborates with Prof Steve Mann from the University of Toronto, who is renowned for his eyetap device - a bit like the Google glasses available to buy in 2014 - which he uses to record his life.

"Steve coined the term 'sous-veillance' which unlike surveillance - watching from above - is about watching from below, by having a camera looking out from your body," she said.

"There's already many 'life bloggers' or 'gloggers' who record their lives - it's a bit like having a black box recorder on your person.

"I think we're entering an era of person-view systems which will show things on ground level and will be increasingly relayed to others via social media."

However, the technologies were emerging so fast that the laws - and social mores - surrounding them could not keep up.

"We've got people like Jonathan Oxer, an Australian who has a microchip implanted in his arm so he can open the door to his house without a key," she said.

"We've got Canadian film-maker Rob Spence who replaced his false eye with a camera-eye so he can record everything he sees.

"We've got people wearing recording devices on their fingers, in their caps or sunglasses - there are huge legal and ethical implications here."