Psychometrics, big data, data-driven approaches, microtargetting, and you

The damning evidence is mounting on CA. Today it was announced that CEO Alexander Nix has been suspended from his position given a Channel 4, UK covert sting recording.

Citation: Katina Michael with Cassie McCullagh, March 21, 2018, "Psychometrics, big data, data-driven approaches, microtargetting, and you", ABC Sydney Radio: FOCUS: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/sydney/programs/focus/focus/9549448

Spectrum in Motion: RadComms 2017

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From network revolutions to micro-chipping humans and uberveillance—set against a backdrop of rapidly approaching 5G networks—RadComms 2017 aims to challenge and inform spectrum planning and reform for the benefit of all Australians.

With a theme of Spectrum reform—empowering users, this year’s event, which runs 1– 2 November in Sydney, features decision-makers and thought-leaders from government and industry to provide an opportunity to find out about—and influence—spectrum reform in Australia.

Minister for Communications, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield, will deliver the opening address, while Nerida O’Loughlin, Chair of the Australian Communications and Media Authority, will make her inaugural address to RadComms. Keynote speeches will be made by ACCC Chairman Rod Sims and Professor Katina Michael, Editor in Chief of the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, who will speak about our headlong progress towards an ‘internet of us’.

Senior ACMA representatives will be joined by experts from Telstra, Ericsson, SES Satellites, Vertel, NNN Co, Myriota, Qualcomm, RTT, RMIT and GoGo, as well as industry groups Communications Alliance, Free TV Australia, AMTA and ARCIA.

Key sessions delivered over the two-day conference include:

• spectrum reform—perspectives from industry about spectrum reform and workshops on three important areas of spectrum reform – radiocommunications licensing, equipment rules and interference management

• network (r)evolutions—evolution and revolution in terrestrial, mobile and satellite networks

• building the industrial internet— How IoT and 5G are enabling a fourth – and global – industrial revolution

• future ACMA activities—our work program, planning issues and spectrum auctions

• emerging standards and new applications—5G, mmWave, satellites and 3GPP processes.

Read more at: https://www.radioinfo.com.au/news/spectrum-motion-radcomms-2017 © Radioinfo.com.au

 

Human Microchips: Employers Going Too Far

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Human microchip implants have been around for awhile, used by home automation enthusiasts and biohacking movements. But Swedish company Epicenter is taking the technology to a whole new context as a workplace monitoring tool.

The microchips have been implanted into 150 employees and will enable them to open doors, use photocopiers and make purchases from the company cafe. However, privacy is a concern for many people.

Professor Katina Michael joined Nic to discuss the importance of personal choice in using implantables and the problems that may arise when companies and governments use the technology for potentially nefarious purposes.

Citation: Katina Michael with Nick Healy, "Human Microchips: Employees Go Far", 2SERFM Breakfast, May 5, 2017, 6.45-6.50am, http://2ser.com/human-microchips-employers-going-far/, Producers: Jennifer Luu.

Would you Microchip Your Hand?

Description: Katina Michael - Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong - chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about the ethical implications of Swedish workers getting RFID tags inserted into their hands to give them access to doors and photocopiers at work.

Source here

Citation: Katina Michael with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, April 7, 2017, "Would You Microchip Your Hand", Talking Technology, Talking Lifestyle, https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/would-you-micro-chip-your-hand, Macquarie Media Ltd.

Techtopia: what does your phone know about you?

Original source here: http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4535025.htm

ELEANOR HALL: Welcome to Techtopia, our segment on the technologies set to disrupt our future and some of the unexpected questions we may need to ask about them.

Today a technology we're all familiar with: our phone. It has gone from staid, home-based handset to wearable message conveyor, music player, direction giver and so much more. 

But how familiar are we with what our smart phones know about us and what are they doing with that information? 

Joining me in Sydney, as he does every week for Techtopia, is entrepreneur and technology author Steve Sammartino.

Also here in our Sydney studio, is Dr Katina Michael, a Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong, who is also on the board of the Australian Privacy Foundation.


FEATURED: 
Steve Sammartino, entrepreneur and technology author
Dr Katina Michael, professor, School of Computing and Information Technology, University of Wollongong; board member, Australian Privacy Foundation

L to R: Katina Michael, Eleanor Hall, Steve Sammartino

Citation: Steve Sammartino and Katina Michael with Eleanor Hall, "Techtopia: what does your phone know about you?", ABC World Todayhttp://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4535025.htm

Uberveillance on Flipboard

MG Michael and I do not know the creators of this Flipboard: https://flipboard.com/@unsecurity/uberveillance-190rhkgiz that utilises the UBERVEILLANCE meme. One thing is for certain they gather some of the world's most relevant stories in relationship to the broader theme of uberveillance. The issues are organised by @unsecurity @mikeal0102 and @mlcp (Doris Cook).

Living In A Smart World

Key Link

Authors

Author: Tiffany Hoy, Editor: Wang Yuanyuan, Global Times - Xinhua China
Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong

Abstract

As "smart" devices continue to advance, government regulation is lagging far behind, leaving citizens vulnerable to giving away their private information without their knowledge, said Katina Michael, vice chair of the Australian Privacy Foundation.

People sometimes don't even know what embedded sensors are in the devices that they're carrying, Michael said, but the information that they record can be pieced together to create a frightening surveillance profile. "There are many social implications if I know your whereabouts 24 x 7. I can track your location history, for example -- I know exactly where you were on the Earth's surface, I know how fast you were traveling which tells me your mode of transport, if any, and I'm probably able to infer what you were doing," said Michael.

"If I know through the devices that you're carrying: who you are -- through your ID, where you are -- through GPS or wifi enablement, when you were there -- through a timestamp, and what you were doing -- through the visual imagery you are taking photos or records of, then we pretty much know what is actually in your mind," she added.

Moving towards a more transparent society, where mobile recording devices can be used to capture what's happening at any given time -- with life-bloggers recording every waking moment through autography devices, and police use dashboard cameras and headsets to record video later used as evidence in court, also comes with a trade-off: the erosion of personal privacy.

"There's an asymmetry involved here. The wearer of these wearable devices is always a more powerful constituent in this relationship. Those individuals who choose not to be a part of this new information society may find themselves on the wrong side of any particular imbalance," Michael said. "The asymmetry gets greater and greater as the number of devices grow, (between) those that have wearables and those who don't, and those who don't wish to participate and live off-grid. "Yes we understand that once we step out our front door we can' t expect privacy. But private things can be gathered, such as the clothes that we wear, the places that we frequent, if I want to go to a religious building on a weekend ... I should have an expectation of privacy and there should not be recordings of me going about my everyday life," she added.

Suggested Citation

Global Times - Xinhua China and Katina Michael. "Living in a smart world" Global Times Jun. 2013.

TEDxUWollongong: The Social Implications of Microchipping People

A/Professor Katina Michael from the University of Wollongong, speaks at the 2012 TEDxUWollongong on the moral and ethical dilemmas of emerging technologies. The 3 scenarios she performs raise very interesting social implications for our humanity. http://www.tedxuwollongong.com  

Speaker playlist here

Photostream available here

New Editor for T&S Magazine

Associate Professor Katina Michael of the University of Wollongong, Wollongong, N.S.W., Australia, has been appointed by the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology (SSIT) to be the new Editor of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

Prof. Michael will begin as Editor-in-Chief with the Spring 2012 issue of T&S. Long-time T&S Magazine Editor Keith Miller of the University of Illinois-Springfield will step down after the Winter (Dec.) 2011 issue after an accomplished and award winning tenure.

Prof. Michael has been an Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong, School of Information Systems and Technology since 2002. She co-chaired the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS’10), held in Wollongong, Australia, and is the Co-Guest Editor of the current (Fall 2011) Special Issue of T&S Magazine, featuring articles from that conference. Previously, in Summer 2010, Prof. Michael co-guest-edited a special section of T&S Magazine on “Uberveillance.”

Prof. Michael’s research has been predominantly in the area of emerging technologies, with secondary interests in technologies used for national security and their corresponding social implications. Before her affiliation with the University of Wollongong, she worked as a Senior Network Engineer at Nortel Networks and earlier as a Systems Analyst at Andersen Consulting and at Otis Elevator Company.

Prof. Michael has published several edited books, and she recently co-authored a 500-page reference volume: Innovative Automatic Identification and Location Based Services: from Bar Codes to Chip Implants (Hershey, PA: IGI, 2009). She has published over 85 peer reviewed papers. Prof. Michael can be reached at University of Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia; Email: katina@uow.edu.au

Citation: T&S Staff, September 12, 2011, "New editor for T&S Magazine", IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, Vol. 30, No. 3, p. 4, Fall 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6017260/