Tech for Good: The Role of ICT in Achieving the SDGs

What opportunities and challenges do digital technologies present for the development of our society?

https://vimeo.com/288621991

https://vimeo.com/288621991

I truly believe that we can harness technology for good. That information and communication technology is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. But more than this? We need to be human. Being human means that we can achieve anything together through compassion, care, foresight, and long-term sustainability. Right now we use technology in ways that helps us to gain access to critical information, but also as a means to become more engrossed in ourselves and our personal interests alone. What about the public interest? What about public interest technologies like those being suggested by the SDG Academy an all of its speakers? Think on doing this rewarding course. It takes a mission critical view of how technology can be used (or abused) as a tool for dis(empowerment). We have a choice- from our perspective the choice is easy- we MUST use technology for good.

The trailer for the magnificent SDG Academy. Here are courses delivered by the SDG Academy. More about the free online courses here.

My involvement was in 3 MOOCS related to: privacy, data rights, security and ethics, with a heavy emphasis on human rights throughout. Stay tuned for more.

About this course

Tech for Good was developed by UNESCO and Cetic.br/NIC.br, the Brazilian Network Information Center’s Regional Center for Studies on the Development of the Information Society. It brings together thought leaders and changemakers in the fields of information and communication technologies (ICT) and sustainable development to show how digital technologies are empowering billions of people around the world by providing access to education, healthcare, banking, and government services; and how “big data” is being used to inform smarter, evidence-based policies to improve people’s lives in fundamental ways.

It also addresses the new challenges that technology can introduce, such as privacy, data management, risks to cybersecurity, e-waste, and the widening of social divides. Ultimately, Tech for Good looks at the ways in which stakeholders are coming together to answer big questions about what our future will look like in a hyper-digitized world.

This course is for:

Technology specialists who want to understand more about how ICT is being used to improve people’s lives around the world.
Sustainable development practitioners who need to understand the opportunities and limitations of technology in a development context.
Advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in the key concepts and practices of this exciting and ever-changing field.

What you'll learn

  • ICT can improve access to knowledge and services, promote transparency, and encourage collaboration

  • Responsible collection and use of data requires governance, security, and trust

  • ICT projects should be contextualized and inclusive

  • Technology is not neutral! Be aware of bias in design and implementation

 Hide Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus

Module 1: Welcome to the Digital Age

  • Introduction to the Course

  • Bridging the Digital Divide

  • Three Approaches to ICT for the SDGs

Module 2: Technology for Governments and Citizens

  • Equity and Access to Services

  • User-Driven Public Administration

  • It's All About the Data

  • The Open Government Approach

  • Case Study: Aadhaar in India

  • The Challenges of Digital Government

Module 3: ICT Infrastructure

  • Enabling ICT: The Role of Infrastructure

  • Promoting Digital Inclusivity

  • Innovations in Infrastructure

  • Building Smart Sustainable Cities

  • ICT as Infrastructure: A Look at Societal Platforms

Module 4: ICT Innovations in Health

  • Achieving Universal Health Coverage

  • Improving Healthcare Delivery

  • Involving the Community

  • Evidence in Action: Success Stories of ICT and Health

  • Emerging Challenges and Opportunities

Module 5: Learning in Knowledge Societies

  • The Ecosystem of ICT for Education

  • Education for a Connected World

  • Sharing Knowledge: ICT, Openness, and Inclusion

  • Measuring ICT and Education: Frameworks

  • Measuring ICT and Education: Data and Indicators

  • Rethinking ICT for Education Policies

Module 6: Promoting Financial Inclusion

  • An Introduction to Financial Services

  • The Potential of Digital Platforms

  • Mobile Payments for Marginalized Communities

  • ICT for Enabling Access to Credit

  • Replacing the Cash Economy

  • The Challenges of ICT-enabled Financial Inclusion

Module 7: Measurement and Metrics

  • Managing Data for the SDGs

  • ICT Innovation for Statistical Development

  • Engaging with Data: Communications and Citizen Empowerment

  • Case Study: Brazil’s Cetic.br

  • Measuring ICT

  • ICT for Monitoring the SDGs

  • Limitations of ICT for Monitoring the SDGs

Module 8: Artificial Intelligence

  • An Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

  • Who Drives the Agenda on “AI for Good”?

  • Implications for Discrimination and Exclusion

  • The Human Side of AI: Risks and Ethics

Module 9: Concerns for our Digital Future

  • Privacy and the Importance of Trust

  • Knowing your Data Rights

  • Cybersecurity

  • The Downsides of Digital

Module 10: The Way Forward

  • The New Workforce: Six Points about the Future of Work

  • The Meaning of Work in the Digital Era

  • The Open Movement

  • Closing Thoughts on ICT for the SDGs

Original link here: https://www.edx.org/course/tech-for-good-the-role-of-ict-in-achieving-the-sdgs

K5's Experiential Robotics Goes Wrong

The war between robots and humans is heating up

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Dr Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. She considers the K5 to be a sinister development and has been following its progress since 2013. She’s notes how they look somewhat like the dreaded Daleks from Doctor Who – without the weaponised arm.

What are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?
“If you see one coming toward you,’’ says Professor Michael, “what are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?’’

At trade shows, she’s seen a K5 trip on a buckle in the carpeting and fall over. “The question is when they take a different form in the future…. When they can walk like a human. Then it becomes a different proposition. It doesn’t look so harmless. They’re more mobile. They can be tripped … but get up again.’’

She notes that K5 robots were first trialled by Microsoft and Uber. The Uber connection is significant because the ride-share outfit has disrupted the regulated taxi industry by baldly flouting the law. Surveillance robots are being launched upon us in much the same lawless way.

“It’s autonomous, gathers information and is capable of behavioural analysis. It’s a grave invasion of privacy. They are danger to society because they will develop awareness over time. For the first time we have an autonomous system that can follow humans.’’

The Sustainability Report Podcast

Posted By Rachel Alembakis on October 27, 2017 in Corporate Reporting, Fund Management, podcast. On this episode of The Sustainability Report Podcast, we’re talking about how technology is changing how our economy operates and what disruption means both socially and economically.

Innovation in renewable energy, battery storage and other areas have brought the means to transition our world to a low-carbon future within our grasp, but disruption is a two-sided coin, and companies and stakeholders must think about how their products and processes will shape how we interact.

We’re talking with Dr Katina Michael, a professor at the University of Wollongong in the School of Information Systems and Technology in Australia. Katina has previously been employed as a senior network engineer at Nortel Networks (’96-‘01) and has also worked as a systems analyst at Andersen Consulting and OTIS Elevator Company. Katina addresses the value of privacy, the impacts of artificial intelligence, and how investors and companies could frame the discussion of long term values and ethics.

Producer: Buffy Gorrilla

Original Source: http://www.thesustainabilityreport.com.au/sustainability-report-podcast-dr-katina-michael/

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Rachel Alembakis has published The Sustainability Report since 2011. She has more than a decade of experience writing about institutional investments and pension funds for a variety of publications.

Facial recognition, law enforcement and the risks for and against

Katrina Dunn of Ideapod interviews Katina Michael of UOW.

Facial Recognition and Scope Creep in Australian Proposal

'Before we know it…': worries over feature creep

But surveillance expert Professor Katina Michael pointed to an established trend of technology creeping up in scope and said The Capability would be no exception.

She expected the system to slide down a slippery slope of privacy erosion, eventually being used for petty crime, civil cases and a whole range of purposes unrelated to terrorism.

"It's a farce," she said.

"Before we know it'll be used for breath tests and speeding, it will be used to open a bank account … licences are our primary ID — so does that mean everywhere we've been using them for identity, all the clubs and pubs, will have access to it?

"Even car insurance — [people will think] 'we are using it for drivers' licences, maybe we should also use it for third-party compulsory insurance. And then we need it for health insurance'."

Your face 'may end up on some third-party selling list'

Ms Michael was equally concerned about systematic errors causing potential mistaken identities and leading to people being wrongly accused or suspected of crime.

"It's not going to take long for these systems to be hacked, no matter what security you have in place and once it's hacked, that's it — everyone's facial images will end up on some third-party selling list and possibly on the internet for accessibility."

"Yeah, people put photos on Facebook, but not in that kind of systematic, calculated way.

"Some Australian citizens are going to be completely freaked out."

Original Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-05/facial-recognition-coag-privacy-concerns-about-the-capability/9017494

Citation: Jake Evans and Clare Sibthorpe, "Facial recognition: Feature creep may impose government's software in our lives, expert warns", ABC News, October 5, 2017. Available: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-05/facial-recognition-coag-privacy-concerns-about-the-capability/9017494

When Cameras can Hear and See: The Implications of Behavioural Biometrics

Ms Jennifer Luu is a student at the University of Technology, Sydney completing a Bachelor of Journalism. She also has begun producing stories at 2SER. I am appreciative that our interview on behavioural biometrics was recorded and transcribed by Jennifer herself. Above an audio download, and the full transcription available here.

In My Mind

Today’s woman is sold on the idea you can have it all. But this has transformed into an expectation; you must do it all. These unhealthy expectations driving an anxiety epidemic are explored in this new series from Attitude Pictures. 'In My Mind' is a ground-breaking four-part television series that will premiere on TVNZ 1 Sunday 16th July at 8:30am, and available to watch internationally on our website AttitudeLive.com

Via raw and honest interviews with New Zealand and Australian women of all ages, alongside expert opinion, this four-part series delves into stress, anxiety and mental health. Directed by four Kiwi female directors, each episode focuses on a different catalyst including social media addiction, the challenges of motherhood, body image and burnout as well as techniques to live in these increasingly challenging times.

Are you an addict? Turns out we're all tech junkies

How many times have you looked at your phone today?

Chances are you're looking at it right now.

Before you try and deny you're addicted, here are some stats to consider:

Australian men unlock their phones more than anyone in the world - on average 45 to 46 times a day, while for Australian women it is around 42 times.

Those figures have been calculated by AntiSocial, an app developed by Melbourne software company Bugbean, to monitor people's use of social media.

It is a free app with no ads that is only available on Android because the creators say Apple does not allow such monitoring, but the idea is to encourage users to put down their devices.

Australians spend around two hours a day on apps

According to AntiSocial's developer Chris Eade, Australian men and women spend about two hours a day on their phones, and that is not including use for music streaming, video streaming, or making calls - that is pure Facebook, web surfing, WhatsApp, Instagram, and Snapchat.

VIDEO: Watch the discussion between Emma Alberici, Adam Atler and Katina Michael (Lateline)

Adam Alter, from the Stern School of Business, has written a book called Irresistible - why we can't stop checking, scrolling, clicking and watching.

He told Lateline around 50 per cent of the adult population has some form of behavioural addiction.

"I think you can ask yourself if you have a problem and you'll know," he said.

"[People] feel that their lives are being encroached upon by devices, their social lives, maybe their relationships with their loved ones and friends. They're not experiencing nature. They're not exercising."

Our boredom threshold at rock bottom

Mr Alter said smartphones have changed human behaviour so much that we no longer allow ourselves to experience being bored.

"Our boredom threshold has declined to the point where you'll get in an elevator for five seconds, take out your phone," he said.

Hooked on social media

All in the Mind zooms in on the relationship between social media use and our mental health.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/allinthemind/hooked-on-social-media/7885492

"Boredom is very important for productivity, for creativity and new ideas, and if you never allow yourself to be bored, you will never have those ideas."

Mr Alter has written about a private school near Silicon Valley that uses no technology, yet surprisingly 75 per cent of the students' parents work in the tech sector.

"You'd think their children would be the biggest users of tech. But what you actually find, it's the reverse that a lot of these tech titans refuse to let their kids near technology," he said.

"Steve Jobs in 2010 in an interview said things like, 'you should use this device, but we do not allow it in our home and we won't let our kids near it'. He was talking about the iPad."

How to break up with your device

Katina Michael, from the University of Wollongong's School of Computing and IT, specialises in online addiction, and she told Lateline that tech companies have a lot to answer for.

"I think it's extremely hypocritical," she said.

"The laptop's not made you smarter and more intelligent. I think the companies that Adam was talking about need to recheck their ethics and I think our children need to stop being sold the wrong story about what is going to make their future brighter. We have a lot to answer for as academics."

Professor Michael had this advice for tech addicts looking to wean themselves off their devices:

"Think about replacing the activities that you have done online with offline activities, whether it's going for physical exercise, joining a community group or just getting a job, or just speaking with your family and making real food instead of playing a game about making food," she said.

If you're still questioning whether or not you're addicted, compare how you stack up to AntiSocial's biggest user.

"Our biggest user we have at the moment is a woman in America who uses her phone for 7.5 hours a day, every day on average," Mr Eade said.

"That's a full time job."

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-25/are-you-an-addict-how-australians-are-tech-junkies/8554532

What is the Internet doing to our heads?

We spend more time online than offline, so what is all this screen time doing to our heads?

Presenter/Producer: Cheyne Anderson
Presenter: Ellen Leabeater

Speakers:
Lawrence Lam - Professor of Public Health, University of Technology Sydney
Katina Michael - Professor, School of Computing and IT, University of Wollongong
David Glance - Director Centre for Software Practice, University of Western Australia

Think: Digital Futures is supported by 2SER and the University of Technology Sydney.

2ser.com/thinkdigitalfutures

Consider following below on SoundCloud.

Citation: Cheyne Anderson, Ellen Leabeater, Lawrence Lam, Katina Michael, David Glance, April 23, 2017, "What is the Internet doing to our heads?", 2SERFM Think: Digital Futures, https://soundcloud.com/thinkdigitalfutures/what-is-the-internet-doing-to-our-heads

Nice to see it made available here also: https://www.ivoox.com/what-is-the-internet-doing-to-our-heads-audios-mp3_rf_18287880_1.html

When Google Maps Gets it Wrong

Citation: Katina Michael, Wendy Harmer, "When Google Maps Gets it Wrong", ABC Sydney Mornings, ABC Sydney 702, 9.10am -9.23am, April 21, 2017.

Background:

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/technology-explained-google-maps-work/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Maps

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-19/darwin-man-sick-of-pizza-enquiries-due-to-google-error/8454580

https://support.google.com/maps/answer/3094088?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en

https://support.google.com/maps/answer/6194894?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en

https://support.google.com/maps/answer/7084895?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en

https://www.buchananpr.com/2013/11/4-steps-to-take-when-google-maps-gets-it-wrong

Would you Microchip Your Hand?

Description: Katina Michael - Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong - chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about the ethical implications of Swedish workers getting RFID tags inserted into their hands to give them access to doors and photocopiers at work.

Source here

Citation: Katina Michael with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, April 7, 2017, "Would You Microchip Your Hand", Talking Technology, Talking Lifestyle, https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/would-you-micro-chip-your-hand, Macquarie Media Ltd.