K5's Experiential Robotics Goes Wrong

The war between robots and humans is heating up

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Dr Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. She considers the K5 to be a sinister development and has been following its progress since 2013. She’s notes how they look somewhat like the dreaded Daleks from Doctor Who – without the weaponised arm.

What are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?
“If you see one coming toward you,’’ says Professor Michael, “what are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?’’

At trade shows, she’s seen a K5 trip on a buckle in the carpeting and fall over. “The question is when they take a different form in the future…. When they can walk like a human. Then it becomes a different proposition. It doesn’t look so harmless. They’re more mobile. They can be tripped … but get up again.’’

She notes that K5 robots were first trialled by Microsoft and Uber. The Uber connection is significant because the ride-share outfit has disrupted the regulated taxi industry by baldly flouting the law. Surveillance robots are being launched upon us in much the same lawless way.

“It’s autonomous, gathers information and is capable of behavioural analysis. It’s a grave invasion of privacy. They are danger to society because they will develop awareness over time. For the first time we have an autonomous system that can follow humans.’’

Facial recognition: Feature creep may impose government's software in our lives, expert warns

It's known as 'The Capability' — government facial recognition software to match CCTV footage to passport photos. But new measures to give it access to drivers' licences have surveillance experts worried about what might come next.

Instant facial recognition software used for counter-terrorism could be used on the general public one day if the rules around the use of the software keep changing, a surveillance expert warns.

The ACT Government had this same concern with — though it has still signed on to the changes.

The territory's Attorney-General, Gordon Ramsay, said the ACT Government would continue negotiations on the biometric capability of the facial recognition software, known as The Capability, which matches faces from CCTV footage to passports — and with them, all of a person's associated data.

COAG has agreed to add drivers' licences to that system, and to speed up the week-long process, making The Capability instant.

But the ACT has asked for assurances that data will only be used outside of counter-terrorism when the Capability returns a perfect match.

It was the only jurisdiction that raised privacy concerns .

"One of the things that we would always be looking to is the access and the way that information can be used, they will be part of the ongoing negotiations," Mr Ramsay said.

'Before we know it…': worries over feature creep

But surveillance expert Professor Katina Michael pointed to an established trend of technology creeping up in scope and said The Capability would be no exception.

She expected the system to slide down a slippery slope of privacy erosion, eventually being used for petty crime, civil cases and a whole range of purposes unrelated to terrorism.

"It's a farce," she said.

"Before we know it'll be used for breath tests and speeding, it will be used to open a bank account … licences are our primary ID — so does that mean everywhere we've been using them for identity, all the clubs and pubs, will have access to it?

"Even car insurance — [people will think] 'we are using it for drivers' licences, maybe we should also use it for third-party compulsory insurance. And then we need it for health insurance'."

Your face 'may end up on some third-party selling list'

Ms Michael was equally concerned about systematic errors causing potential mistaken identities and leading to people being wrongly accused or suspected of crime.

"It's not going to take long for these systems to be hacked, no matter what security you have in place and once it's hacked, that's it — everyone's facial images will end up on some third-party selling list and possibly on the internet for accessibility."

"Yeah, people put photos on Facebook, but not in that kind of systematic, calculated way.

"Some Australian citizens are going to be completely freaked out."

Fergus Hanson, head of cyber policy at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said Australians needed to think about where the "guard rails" around privacy should be.

"I think we can all agree that it's useful to use systems like this to track down terrorists or to track down murderers, [but] what happens when we start having more minor crimes being prosecuted and people arrested using this same technology?" Mr Hanson said.

"Would we be OK for example with the Government using that technology to track down someone who hadn't paid a parking fine?

"DNA testing, originally that was a very niche capability that developed, and now it's run of the mill technology that you would run for lots of different crime types."

Mr Hanson said the public needs to consider who ought to own personal data, and how it might be used in the future.

"You don't have to go very far back in history to appreciate why privacy is important, and the constraints that need to be there around states in terms of how they exercise their authority," he said.At the COAG National Security Summit, .

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr said "it is more perhaps in sorrow than in anger" that the heightened terrorism threats facing Australia had sparked the need for harsher measures.

"Nonetheless, all jurisdictions have signed up today and it reflects the need for a joined up and collective response to difficult issues," Mr Barr said.

"But to do so within the framework of a Human Rights Act that we have in the ACT has required us to work closely with the Commonwealth to achieve the outcome.

"And I want to acknowledge that that has been achieved, and that's an important thing for residents in the ACT."

Citation: Jake Evans and Clare Sibthorpe, October 5, 2017, "Facial recognition: Feature creep may impose government's software in our lives, expert warns", Australian Broadcasting Corporation News.

Agencies may access IDs

Government agencies could get approved access to part of the Commonwealth's newly proposed facial recognition program.

The Facial Verification Service, part of the federal government's new "Capability" program, would be accessible by departments such as the Department of Human Services or the Australian Taxation Office.

The system would be used to provide a one-for-one match from a person's existing photo with any other government-issued identities they may hold, rather than returning multiple potential matches.

The Attorney-General's Department said government agencies and private businesses would have to complete a privacy impact statement before given access.

"Organisations using the service would need to demonstrate their lawful basis to do so under the Privacy Act, and could only use the FVS where they gain a person's consent to use their images," a spokesman said.

Surveillance expert Professor Katina Michael of the University of Wollongong said access should only be granted on a case-by-case basis, concerned that Capability could be linked to a person's metadata or even tax file number.

"What I can't understand is it's open at all times indefinitely," Professor Michael said. "That is not professional. It's warrantless searching."

She also raised concerns about the private sector having access to the system.

"It's going to be bidirectional. This is a lovely symbiosis between government and industry. This is the only way that government can crawl their way into the data sets of Facebook and Google."

When originally launched in November, the FVS used photos captured by the Australian Border Force from passports or citizenship photos, and was only available to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade or the Australian Federal Police.

Earlier this month, the federal government announced it would establish the national facial recognition system drawing on issued identification from all Australian jurisdictions allowing FVS users to access state or territory databases.

The Capability now comprises three parts, the Document Verification Service, the FVS and the Facial Identification Service.

The FIS allows law enforcement to scan photos of unknown persons and match them with multiple government records.

"For example, it can be used to identify a suspected paedophile from child exploitation material, or to identify an armed offender from a still image taken from CCTV footage," a spokesman said. There were no current plans to expand access to the FIS.

But Professor Michael was concerned the FIS would eventually be opened up to other agencies and the private sector.

Finbar O'Mallon, October 15, 2017, "Agencies may access IDs", Canberra Times, p. 8.

Biometric Behavioural Analytics

– Professor Katina Michael – Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at University of Wollongong chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about facial recognition technology and whether it could distinguish between twins.

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Citation: Katina Michael speaks with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, "Can twins fool facial recognition technology?", Talking Technology on Talking Lifestyle at 8.40pm-9.00pm, September 7, 2017.

Original source: https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/can-twins-fool-facial-recognition-technology

When Cameras can Hear and See: The Implications of Behavioural Biometrics

Ms Jennifer Luu is a student at the University of Technology, Sydney completing a Bachelor of Journalism. She also has begun producing stories at 2SER. I am appreciative that our interview on behavioural biometrics was recorded and transcribed by Jennifer herself. Above an audio download, and the full transcription available here.

Would you Microchip Your Hand?

Description: Katina Michael - Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong - chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about the ethical implications of Swedish workers getting RFID tags inserted into their hands to give them access to doors and photocopiers at work.

Source here

Citation: Katina Michael with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, April 7, 2017, "Would You Microchip Your Hand", Talking Technology, Talking Lifestyle, https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/would-you-micro-chip-your-hand, Macquarie Media Ltd.

Biometric Borders on Radio New Zealand (The Panel)

The Panel with Niki Bezzant and Peter Elliott (Part 2) and Producer Julie Moffett. 4.44pm. 26/01/17

More here: 

http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/thepanel/audio/201830922/biometric-borders