Biohacking - In the Loop

Love our local "In the Loop" program which is going from strength to strength. What a great place Wollongong is!

Published on 29 Aug 2017

This month Lachy meets some comedians and vampires at the Anywhere Theatre Festival. Greg Ellis chats with Illawarra Steelers legend Brett Rodwell. Marty has a go at beach fishing with Guided Beach Fishing Illawarra. Katina Michael teaches us about implantables and other emerging technologies. Our Innovative Business is Wollongong born start-up Binary Beer & Christie takes Crammy & Brittany from i98FM on a winery tour thanks to Foodscape tours.

In This Months Episode

Adventure and Play - http://guidedbeachfishing.com.au/
Eat & Drink - Foodscape Tours - http://foodscapetours.com.au/
Berry Chocolatier - https://www.facebook.com/berrychocola...
Silos Estate - http://silosestate.com/
Camberwarra Estate - http://www.cambewarraestate.com.au/
Coolangatta Estate - http://www.coolangattaestate.com.au/
Two Figs Winery - http://twofigs.com.au/
Binary Beer - http://www.binarybeer.io/
Anywhere Theatre Festival - http://anywheretheatre.com/

You can stay in the loop with us on:
Our Website - http://intheloop.tv
Facebook: https://facebook.com/intheloopgong
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intheloopgong
Instagram: https://instagram.com/intheloopgong

Media partners:
i98fm - http://i98fm.com.au

Segment sponsors:
Wollongong Central - http://www.wollongongcentral.com.au
University of Wollongong - http://www.uow.edu.au
Access Law Group - http://www.accesslawgroup.com.au
The Illawarra Mercury - http://www.illawarramercury.com.au
Advantage Wollongong - http://www.advantagewollongong.com.au
Destination Wollongong - http://visitwollongong.com.au
Internetrix - http://www.internetrix.com.au
Relativity Films - http://relativity.com.au
Lancaster Law & Mediation - http://lancasterlaw.com.au
Kaizen Business & Financial - http://www.kaizenbf.com.au


Promotional Partners:
Illawarra Hawks - http://www.hawks.com.au
Digital Print Bureau - http://digitalprintbureau.com.au
Illawarra Women In Business - http://www.iwib.com.au
Novotel Northbeach - http://novotelnorthbeach.com.au
Dee Kramer Photography - http://www.deekramer.com
St George Illawarra Dragons - http://www.dragons.com.au

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NFC Innovation Award

NFC Industry, Customer Experience and Product Design Leaders Share 2017 Outlook and Predictions on NFC Technology

Transport, IoT, wearables, cloud-based services experts from across the NFC technology sector – all judges for the new NFC Forum Innovations Awards — anticipate the NFC tech trends that will define 2017

As the entry process for the NFC Forum Innovation Awards gathers pace, we asked the experts on our Judging Panel to anticipate the NFC tech trends that will define 2017. The prestigious list of judges features a host of well-known names from across the NFC technology sector. This week we hear from: Dr. Katina Michael, IEEE and the University of Wollongong; Paul Gosden, Terminal Director, GSMA and Randy Vanderhoof, Executive Director, Smart Card Alliance.
NFC Forum Innovation Awards

We queried the esteemed panel of 9 judges about NFC innovation and what NFC trends they see happening in 2017. We will be sharing their responses over the next few weeks leading up to the entry deadline for the NFC Forum Innovation Awards. Companies and developers using NFC in new, disruptive and innovative ways are invited to submit award entries showcasing their work for the chance to win in one of three award categories. Semi-finalists will be invited to the NFC Innovation Awards Reception on March 14, 2017, in Las Vegas, which is co-located with the NFC Forum’s Members Meeting. Finalists receive two nights paid hotel room in Las Vegas, award trophy, global recognition and networking opportunities. There is no cost to enter and the deadline for award submissions is January 11, 2017.

Question: What NFC trend or new opportunity will ramp-up or emerge in 2017?

In 2017, we will see a great deal of experimentation continuing in the space of NFC-based humancentric applications. These opportunities will especially take the form of wearables and bearables for identity, physical access control, financial transactions, and even niche applications like prisoner verification systems that are NFC-enabled. Certainly, we are at the point where convergence in technology will mean NFC will be a part of just about any innovation that requires human to machine interaction (e.g. gaming) or even machine to machine interaction (e.g. supply chain). The underlying premise for the use of NFC is the “convenience” value proposition, which has the direct effect of increased usage.

Dr. Katina Michael is a senior member of the IEEE and is on the board for the IEEE Council on RFID. She is also the Associate Dean International at the University Of Wollongong, Australia

More here

The Technological Trajectory: From Wearables to Implantables

Key Link

Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong
Katherine AlbrechtCASPIAN

Abstract

wearables.jpg

We've seen waves of automatic identification innovation since the 1960s. First bar codes changed the face of the supermarket checkout, then magnetic-stripe cards changed banking, smart cards made a debut for telecommunications and much more in Europe especially, then biometrics for electronic benefits schemes and other government-to-citizen transactions, and the finally contactless cards and microchip implants for the identification of bovine, swine and fish. While the selection environment of these technologies continues to increase, integration and convergence of infrastructure and various auto-ID techniques is rapidly occurring. What does this mean for citizens in every day life? Will predictive analytics be used to manipulate our purchasing behaviours or decision making capacities? This discussion addresses matters to do with free will, autonomy, the right to be left alone, and human rights and dignity. It also maintains that the more time we give over to devices that we wear, the harder it will be to loose the shackles from the technology grip. Katina calls this high-tech lust. It is a type of addiction. How do we get back our work-life balance? In the busy world of instant communications how do we leave some time for the self to develop privately through meditation and other activities that bring us not closer to technology, but closer to each other as people.

Suggested Citation: Katina Michael and Katherine Albrecht. "The Technological Trajectory: From Wearables to Implantables" Katherine Albrecht: Talk Radio with a Freedom Twist Jul. 2013.

Is RFID safe and secure?

Elizabeth Latham, Radio Comms journalist

We've heard a lot about RFID - it's used in supermarkets, implanted in pets and even by blood banks - but is it actually secure? Is the information we put on these chips safe from hackers? RFID is a very useful technology, especially in production because it is usually non-line-of-sight (nLOS). This means that cartons or pallets do not require a particular orientation  or scanning, unlike bar codes. This aids in the automation of many tasks throughout the supply chain that have typically been labour intensive, such as checking and scanning incoming
inventory.

Organisations also have an accurate picture of stock levels, which in turn means lower inventory costs and fewer out-of-stock occurrences. 

Can you trust the RFID to hold your information? 

Dr Katina Michael, senior lecturer in the School of Information Systems and Technology, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, believes it's all a matter of context, but would not advise the use of RFID for access control types of applications.

"Security has to be identified as the number one disadvantage of RFID. Although it should be stated that researchers are working hard to overcome this hurdle, offering a variety of partial solutions," Michael said. 

While standards are beginning to emerge like EPCglobal, there is a great number of proprietary specific RFID standards on the market. The standard denotes how a message is stored, the length of a message (for example 128-bit) and a sequence of bits that tell a reader when to start and stop reading, as well as additional error-checking bits. 

How does information get tampered with?

 "It is as simple as acquiring the relevant reader and working out what each bit in the message means, and interpreting that information correctly. Bits can be encoded using a particular scheme, but once the scheme is identified, the  information can be read," Michael said. 

"Given RFID is wireless, you need be in the proximity of 90 centimetres (dependent on the range requirements of the tag) to intercept the radio signal. So once you have read the chip you can simply play back the signal you picked up and pretend to be someone you are not."

This has major implications for active tags because it means the hacker cannot only read information but write to the tag as well, and even change variables

"When a new technology enters the market, hackers are presented with a new challenge. And so the race begins for who can 'crack the code' so to speak," Michael said.

How can you protect yourself from hackers?

There are many options to choose from when trying to protect data. For example, it is possible to kill off the RFID tag after a certain time and datestamp on the chip. The information on the chip can also be encrypted and passwords placed on the tags.

Two main approaches have been adopted by researchers: either a separate piece of hardware is required (hard solution), or a software-based solution is adopted (soft solution). Blocker tags (such as ancillary RFID tags) can also help solve the problem of hacking by preventing
unauthorised scanning of items. 

It is also possible to use antennae energy analysis to gauge the distance of a reader from a tag or storing a biometric onboard the RFID chip. "All the RFID security-privacy solutions being proposed are only partial solutions and each has its benefits and limitations. At the crux of the
matter is the unique ID of the actual RFID tag, how this information is stored and whether or not passwords have a role to play and how anonymity is ensured," Michael said.

More recently, developments for human-centric applications have seen RFID go into the subdermal layer of the skin in the form of a transponder. "The argument for this latest development to 'protect' information is simple - if it's beneath the skin the ID chip cannot be stolen, is with you everywhere you go, is lightweight, it cannot be duplicated, a perpetrator
does not know you have something implanted, and the RFID chip can be accessed at crucial times with your prior consent," Michael said. 

Michael warns that the benefits of the above method of protection are misleading. Chips can still be read by persons in close proximity to an implantee, or even by unobtrusive readers that can trigger the device to emit a signal.

So, you decide. Is the risk worth it? What information is on the RFID chip and do you want someone to have access to it?

Citation: Elizabeth Latham, 2006, "Is RFID Safe and Secure?", Radio Comms, February 12, 2007: http://www.radiocomms.com.au/radiocomms/feature_article/item_022007a.asp