K5's Experiential Robotics Goes Wrong

The war between robots and humans is heating up

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Dr Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong. She considers the K5 to be a sinister development and has been following its progress since 2013. She’s notes how they look somewhat like the dreaded Daleks from Doctor Who – without the weaponised arm.

What are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?
“If you see one coming toward you,’’ says Professor Michael, “what are you meant to do? Take out your umbrella and start hitting it?’’

At trade shows, she’s seen a K5 trip on a buckle in the carpeting and fall over. “The question is when they take a different form in the future…. When they can walk like a human. Then it becomes a different proposition. It doesn’t look so harmless. They’re more mobile. They can be tripped … but get up again.’’

She notes that K5 robots were first trialled by Microsoft and Uber. The Uber connection is significant because the ride-share outfit has disrupted the regulated taxi industry by baldly flouting the law. Surveillance robots are being launched upon us in much the same lawless way.

“It’s autonomous, gathers information and is capable of behavioural analysis. It’s a grave invasion of privacy. They are danger to society because they will develop awareness over time. For the first time we have an autonomous system that can follow humans.’’

A high-tech point of view

Helmet cameras and glasses that can record a persons point-of-view (POV) of the world were some of the subjects discussed at a conference held at the Wollongong City Beach Function Centre over the weekend.

The inaugural AUPOV09 national conference focussed on POV technologies - hands-free video and audio technologies that record your POV - and their applied use in an educational training and assessment context.

The conference brought together delegates from private enterprise, the Australian Navy, Australian Armed Forces, University of Wollongong, University of NSW, commercial publishers, educational consultants, and POV manufacturing and retail distributers.

http://www.sports-camera.com/

http://www.sports-camera.com/

UOW academics Associate Professor Tony Herrington (Education), Dr MG Michael (Informatics) and Dr Katina Michael (Informatics) addressed the conference.

Prof Herrington spoke on the topic of Mobile Learning at UOW and the use of emerging technologies such as mobile smart phones in education.

e presented some of the findings of a recent project of which he was a lead collaborator, The New Technologies, New Pedagogies, which investigated and created new teaching and learning strategies using mobile technologies.

Dr Michael and Dr Michael presented a plenary session on Teaching Ethics Using Wearable Computing and the Social Implications of the New 'Veillance'.

Citation: ILM, June 30, 2009, "A high-tech point of view", Illawarra Mercury, p. 24.