The Sustainability Report Podcast

Posted By Rachel Alembakis on October 27, 2017 in Corporate Reporting, Fund Management, podcast. On this episode of The Sustainability Report Podcast, we’re talking about how technology is changing how our economy operates and what disruption means both socially and economically.

Innovation in renewable energy, battery storage and other areas have brought the means to transition our world to a low-carbon future within our grasp, but disruption is a two-sided coin, and companies and stakeholders must think about how their products and processes will shape how we interact.

We’re talking with Dr Katina Michael, a professor at the University of Wollongong in the School of Information Systems and Technology in Australia. Katina has previously been employed as a senior network engineer at Nortel Networks (’96-‘01) and has also worked as a systems analyst at Andersen Consulting and OTIS Elevator Company. Katina addresses the value of privacy, the impacts of artificial intelligence, and how investors and companies could frame the discussion of long term values and ethics.

Producer: Buffy Gorrilla

Original Source: http://www.thesustainabilityreport.com.au/sustainability-report-podcast-dr-katina-michael/

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Rachel Alembakis has published The Sustainability Report since 2011. She has more than a decade of experience writing about institutional investments and pension funds for a variety of publications.

Personal Information Entrusted to Government Leaked to the Public

Podcast available here 

Centrelink and Veterans Leak Sources:

Summary

https://theconversation.com/how-the-law-allows-governments-to-publish-your-private-information-74304

Robo-Debt

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-21/how-centrelink-can-win-back-trust-after-the-robo-debt-debacle/8372788

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/centrelink-robodebt-government-pledges-fairer-deal-after-backlash-20170214-gucz6t.html

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/centrelinks-robodebt-creating-a-climate-of-fear-20170307-gut1z7.html

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/not-good-enough-labor-slams-centrelink-robodebt-changes-20170215-guda4r.html

Centrelink Leak

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-28/watchdog-inquiries-after-centrelink-leaked-personal-information/8310034

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-03/centrelink-debt:-senate-concerned-about-impact-of-dhs-releases/8321478

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-01/centrelink-clients-advised-personal-information-no-longer-safe/8313924

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-17/labor-calls-for-suspension-of-centrelink-debt-recovery-program/8187934

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/centrelinks-crude-new-data-matching-system-falsely-claims-people-owe-large-amounts-of-money-2017-1

Veterans Leak

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/latest-news/labor-backs-law-on-veteran-information/news-story/3b639743bd77dc5cb83337e075e30fd8http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-02/government-wants-new-power-to-release-veterans-personal-info/8320268

http://www.news.com.au/national/politics/personal-medical-and-financial-documents-leaked-by-vets-affairs/news-story/bcdd3410b497f4175bb02faa77f9616e

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/4519232/veterans-anger-over-personal-information-laws-prompt-privacy-review/?cs=12

Laws

Privacy Act 1998 Overview https://www.oaic.gov.au/privacy-law/privacy-act/

Privacy Act 1998 Quick Ref. https://www.oaic.gov.au/agencies-and-organisations/guides/app-quick-reference-tool#toc

Social Security Act 1991 http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ssa1991186/

Veterans Affairs Legislation Amendment (Digital Readiness and Other Measures Bill 2017) http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r5771

Data matching program: https://www.humanservices.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/co050-200710-1105en.pdf

Australian Privacy Principles include:

APP 1 — Open and transparent management of personal information

APP 2 — Anonymity and pseudonymity

APP 3 — Collection of solicited personal information

APP 4 — Dealing with unsolicited personal information

APP 5 — Notification of the collection of personal information

APP 6 — Use or disclosure of personal information

APP 7 — Direct marketing

APP 8 — Cross-border disclosure of personal information

APP 9 — Adoption, use or disclosure of government related identifiers

APP 10 — Quality of personal information

APP 11 — Security of personal information

APP 12 — Access to personal information

APP 13 — Correction of personal information

 

Citation: Katina Michael speaks with Trevor Chappell "The release of personal files from Centrelink and Veterans Affairs to journalists recently and some of the ramifications of this", ABC Radio - Overnights http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/overnights/. Producer Michael Pavlich. 4.20am-5am, 22 March 2017.

Techtopia: what does your phone know about you?

Original source here: http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4535025.htm

ELEANOR HALL: Welcome to Techtopia, our segment on the technologies set to disrupt our future and some of the unexpected questions we may need to ask about them.

Today a technology we're all familiar with: our phone. It has gone from staid, home-based handset to wearable message conveyor, music player, direction giver and so much more. 

But how familiar are we with what our smart phones know about us and what are they doing with that information? 

Joining me in Sydney, as he does every week for Techtopia, is entrepreneur and technology author Steve Sammartino.

Also here in our Sydney studio, is Dr Katina Michael, a Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong, who is also on the board of the Australian Privacy Foundation.


FEATURED: 
Steve Sammartino, entrepreneur and technology author
Dr Katina Michael, professor, School of Computing and Information Technology, University of Wollongong; board member, Australian Privacy Foundation

L to R: Katina Michael, Eleanor Hall, Steve Sammartino

Citation: Steve Sammartino and Katina Michael with Eleanor Hall, "Techtopia: what does your phone know about you?", ABC World Todayhttp://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4535025.htm

Changes to digital privacy laws – but are consumers aware?

Consumers are not aware of new digital privacy laws, says Associate Professor Katina Michael.

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Are consumers really properly protected in this digital era with the introduction of new privacy laws now coming into effect?

According to Associate Professor Katina Michael from UOW’s Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences and Vice Chair of the Australian Privacy Foundation, many consumers are unaware of changes taking place to privacy. In a recent interview broadcast nationally on ABC and a other interviews with SBS Radio and Ten’s Wake Up, Professor Michael said the majority of Australians were unaware who could access their personal information both in Australia and overseas.

She said when applying for a credit card or a home loan, do people really know that their personal credit history is being tracked and precisely what information is being stored about the products they purchase? 

New privacy laws have now been introduced following amendments being passed by Federal Parliament. The laws as they pertain to repayment history information are retrospective to December 2012. Under the new laws, large organisations and agencies that collect personal data are required to take reasonable steps to notify consumers about the collection of sensitive information, why it is being collected and whether or not it is onsold to third parties. Individuals will also be able to request access to their personal information and expect correction to their data if it is incorrect.

Large organisations that send personal data overseas would also be bound by new principles requiring them to take reasonable steps to ensure the data remain private and secure. The Australian Council of Civil Liberties says the laws needed to be updated to recognise the growth of social media websites over recent years where many users are posting personal information about themselves online. Professor Michael emphasised that consumers who used online dating web sites were particularly vulnerable to identity attacks, given the amount of data collected by the agency to perform “matches’ with prospective candidates that was publicly available.

The new laws also include more comprehensive credit reporting which will allow the reporting of information about an individual's credit history over the previous two years to credit providers. Individuals who make a loan or credit card payments more than five days late, may struggle to obtain credit products in the future as a result of the changes. 

Professor Michael told ABC interviewer Rod Quinn: How many consumers are really aware that if they have been only five days late with a payment this will be listed on their credit history? The same goes if one is more than 60 days late for a utility payment. The Australian Privacy Foundation welcomes some aspects of the new laws which it believes will help to strengthen consumers' rights such as civil penalties for companies who are in breach of the Act, and also new enforcement powers by the Privacy Commissioner.

Professor Michael believes the new laws covering personal data could fail if companies send information to countries with weak privacy laws and regulations, or none at all. If a security breach occurs in an overseas organisation organisation it may remain unknown to Australian consumers. She also thinks that small businesses should not have been exempted from the new privacy laws highlighting the fact that 80 per cent of Australia's businesses are small businesses hiring a quarter of Australia's population. Australia made attempts in the 1980s to centralise people’s information on to one card (combining Medicare and Social Security information for example). However, the Australia Card and the Access Card never got off the ground. 

Professor Michael told ABC listeners that there was a real danger in centralising people’s personal data all on to one card should that information fall into the wrong hands or encourage scope creep. “Having all that information in one place is just too penetrable,” she said.
Professor Michael fielded a range of listener enquiries during her ABC Radio interview.

Government cracks down on identity fraud

Key Link

Authors

Jane LeeThe Age
Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong

Article comments

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/government-cracks-down-on-identity-fraud-20121121-29qnf.html#ixzz2DVtXpg00

Abstract

Australian Privacy Foundation board member, Dr Katina Michael, said that while the changes may help prevent businesses ''data mining'' people's personal information online, it could also cause problems for the majority of people who legally use different names in different forms of identification on and offline.

Suggested Citation

Jane Lee and Katina Michael. "Government cracks down on identity fraud" The Age Nov. 2012.