Human Microchips: Employers Going Too Far

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Human microchip implants have been around for awhile, used by home automation enthusiasts and biohacking movements. But Swedish company Epicenter is taking the technology to a whole new context as a workplace monitoring tool.

The microchips have been implanted into 150 employees and will enable them to open doors, use photocopiers and make purchases from the company cafe. However, privacy is a concern for many people.

Professor Katina Michael joined Nic to discuss the importance of personal choice in using implantables and the problems that may arise when companies and governments use the technology for potentially nefarious purposes.

Citation: Katina Michael with Nick Healy, "Human Microchips: Employees Go Far", 2SERFM Breakfast, May 5, 2017, 6.45-6.50am, http://2ser.com/human-microchips-employers-going-far/, Producers: Jennifer Luu.

What is the Internet doing to our heads?

We spend more time online than offline, so what is all this screen time doing to our heads?

Presenter/Producer: Cheyne Anderson
Presenter: Ellen Leabeater

Speakers:
Lawrence Lam - Professor of Public Health, University of Technology Sydney
Katina Michael - Professor, School of Computing and IT, University of Wollongong
David Glance - Director Centre for Software Practice, University of Western Australia

Think: Digital Futures is supported by 2SER and the University of Technology Sydney.

2ser.com/thinkdigitalfutures

Consider following below on SoundCloud.

Citation: Cheyne Anderson, Ellen Leabeater, Lawrence Lam, Katina Michael, David Glance, April 23, 2017, "What is the Internet doing to our heads?", 2SERFM Think: Digital Futures, https://soundcloud.com/thinkdigitalfutures/what-is-the-internet-doing-to-our-heads

Nice to see it made available here also: https://www.ivoox.com/what-is-the-internet-doing-to-our-heads-audios-mp3_rf_18287880_1.html

Does Google Maps New Update Breach Our Privacy?

Google Maps have announced their latest feature that allows for a user to share their location with others, by tracking their location in real time on the map. While the app aims to assist its users , the question lies whether the feature enables privacy concerns? Joining me on the line to discuss how the new feature can be abused, is Katina Michael, Associate Dean at International Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at University of Wollongong.

Produced by Brooke Taylor

US ESTA VISA Form Now Requesting Social Media Data

Social media profiles are currently on request by US Customs and Border protection, so at the moment this is optional, but for those wanting temporary visas, it looks like the US will be requiring a social media profile as condition of entry.  Roderick spoke with Professor Katina Michael - Associate Dean at International Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at University of Wollongong, who says that this has far-reaching implications for privacy and human rights.

Full Citation: Katina Michael and Roderick Chambers, "Social media profiles needed for US temporary visas", The Daily-2SERFM, 30 December 2016, 10.47-10.58am. Available: http://www.2ser.com/component/k2/item/26676-social-media-profiles-needed-for-us-temporary-visas

Online Privacy and the 2016 Census

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Tomorrow night Australians will fill out their 2016 census form. Last year the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) announced that it will be keeping personal information from this year’s census returns for four years as an additional source of data to help improve community support services. But there are concerns about the security of identifiable information such as names and addresses, place of birth and household details. Should we be concerned? We were joined by Associate Professor Katina Michael in the School of Information Technology and Computer Science at the University of Wollongong to find out more.

Citation: Produced by Laura Chung, Katina Michael with Nik Healey, August 15, 2016, "Online Privacy and the 2016 Census", 2SERFM Breakfasthttps://2ser.com/online-privacy-2016-census/