Pop password pill, or simply stick it

Alysha Aitkennews.com.au
Katina MichaelUniversity of Wollongong

Abstract

But University of Wollongong professor Katina Michael warned the tatts and pills could easily be tampered with and were “an invasion of bodily privacy.”

“Everyone is trying to find a solution to the password problem, but by inviting the password problem into the body or on to the body, we’re magnifying the problem,” Michael said.

“You can’t ensure that the token is free from interference from another person or an organisation. There will be a lot of counterfeit pills that cause a lot of headaches.”

She said people just need to create stronger passwords.

Suggested Citation: Alysha Aitken and Katina Michael. "Pop password pill, or simply stick it" mX June 7. 2013.

Full article here in text:

TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION

FORGET remembering passwords. Tattoos and swallowing pills could soon replace manually entering computer and smartphone passwords.

Mechanical engineer Regina Dugan has revealed plans to create wearable tech tattoos containing tiny sensors that would communicate with your gadgets, at the All Things Digital's D11 conference in California.

``Authentication is irritating. So irritating that only about half the people do it even though there's a lot of information about you on your smartphone,'' Dugan said.

But the sticker-like tattoo can only be worn for a week at a time, so if you're not so keen on the tatt, you can opt for the password vitamin.

The US-approved pill, which is swallowed daily, emits a signal that allows your body and gadgets to communicate, removing the need for a password.

``Essentially, your entire body becomes your authentication token,'' Dugan said.

But University of Wollongong professor Katina Michael warned the tatts and pills could easily be tampered with and were ``an invasion of bodily privacy''.

``Everyone is trying to find a solution to the password problem, but by inviting the password problem into the body or on to the body, we're magnifying the problem,'' Michael said.

``You can't ensure that the token is free from interference from another person or an organisation. There will be a lot of counterfeit pills that cause a lot of headaches.''

She said people just needed to create stronger passwords.