Facial recognition, law enforcement and the risks for and against

Katrina Dunn of Ideapod interviews Katina Michael of UOW.

Facial recognition limited to serious offences but APF says disproportionate

Thank you to Naomi Woodley from the ABC for inviting comment from the Australian Privacy Foundation on the topic of invasive technology adoption by the government for the purposes of "national security". The press release from the APF, Digital Rights Watch, Electronic Frontiers Australia and a number of other non-government organisations can be found below.

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The Federal Government says police will only be able to use a national facial recognition database when they are investigating serious crimes that carry a penalty of three years in jail or more.

But privacy advocates still don't believe the database is needed.

Professor Katina Michael from the Australian Privacy Foundation says, if it must go ahead, then its use should be overseen by a specific commissioner.

Duration: 2min 43sec
Broadcast: Fri 6 Oct 2017, 6:05am
Original source here: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/facial-recognition-to-be-limited-to-serious-offences-keenan/9021468

Featured:
Michael Keenan, Justice Minister
Professor Katina Michael, School of Computing and Information Technology, University of Wollongong

Credits: Author- Naomi Woodley

Citation: Michael Keenan and Katina Michael with Naomi Woodley, "Facial recognition to be limited to serious offences: Keenan", ABC AM, Available at: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/facial-recognition-to-be-limited-to-serious-offences-keenan/9021468.

 

APF Joint Press Release

Comprehensive national face database incompatible with a free society

Australia’s leading privacy and civil liberties organisations condemn the decision by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) to provide all images from state and territory driver’s licence databases to the federal National Facial Biometric Matching Capability.

These organisations are the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch, Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, NSW Council for Civil Liberties, Liberty Victoria, South Australian Council for Civil Liberties and Electronic Frontiers Australia.

The creation of such a comprehensive national facial database is an unnecessary and disproportionate invasion of the privacy rights of all Australians, is the foundation for suspicionless, warrantless mass surveillance and is fundamentally incompatible with a free and open society.

David Vaile, Chair of the Australian Privacy Foundation said, “This government has proven it is blind and deaf to privacy and personal information security threats. Make no mistake – this database will affect all Australians, even the most conscientious and law-abiding. It will likely generate massive ‘false positive’ lists that will flood our very effective police and security services with useless distractions. We’ve already seen calls for ‘scope creep’ to cover welfare enforcement, and there’s every reason to expect this capability will come to be used to identify people with unpaid fines and other minor issues that have nothing whatsoever to do with terrorism.”

Tim Singleton Norton, Chair of Digital Rights Watch said, “This is a gross overreach into the privacy of everyday Australian citizens, and will have huge impacts on the trust in government to manage this database.  What is urgently needed is proper consultation, evidence and debate - in parliament, with civil society and the public themselves. Whilst we of course must ensure that our law enforcement agencies have the tools necessary to undertake their important work, this should not come at the expense of citizen’s rights to privacy.”

Angus Murray, Vice-President of the Queensland Council for Civil Liberties said, “The protection of the Australian community is fundamentally important – however, this also includes the protection of Australians’ civil liberties and privacy. Today’s agreement, and this continued scope creep, clearly highlights the need for the introduction of a tort of serious invasions of privacy and enforceable Human Rights legislation. It is incumbent on the Parliament to ensure that today’s COAG agreement on the National Facial Biometric Matching Capability is demonstrably necessary, adequate and proportionate, and subject to proper public scrutiny.”

Stephen Blanks, President of the NSW Council for Civil Liberties said, "The community does not yet understand the real implications of facial recognition technology and how fundamentally the way people can access public spaces like airports, sporting facilities and shopping centres will change. When they understand the realities of this technology, people will be very concerned."

Jon Lawrence, Executive Officer of Electronic Frontiers Australia said, “This decision is nothing less than a complete betrayal of a fundamental civil liberty of all Australians.  If implemented, it will ensure that the presumption of innocence no longer has any effective meaning in this country. Such an untargeted, mass surveillance database is just the latest attempt by governments to categorise everyone as potential suspects, not citizens.”

These organisations therefore call on all Australians concerned about this initiative to contact both their state/territory and federal parliamentarians to help them understand that this initiative is an example of government overreach that is simply unacceptable.

Facial Recognition and Scope Creep in Australian Proposal

'Before we know it…': worries over feature creep

But surveillance expert Professor Katina Michael pointed to an established trend of technology creeping up in scope and said The Capability would be no exception.

She expected the system to slide down a slippery slope of privacy erosion, eventually being used for petty crime, civil cases and a whole range of purposes unrelated to terrorism.

"It's a farce," she said.

"Before we know it'll be used for breath tests and speeding, it will be used to open a bank account … licences are our primary ID — so does that mean everywhere we've been using them for identity, all the clubs and pubs, will have access to it?

"Even car insurance — [people will think] 'we are using it for drivers' licences, maybe we should also use it for third-party compulsory insurance. And then we need it for health insurance'."

Your face 'may end up on some third-party selling list'

Ms Michael was equally concerned about systematic errors causing potential mistaken identities and leading to people being wrongly accused or suspected of crime.

"It's not going to take long for these systems to be hacked, no matter what security you have in place and once it's hacked, that's it — everyone's facial images will end up on some third-party selling list and possibly on the internet for accessibility."

"Yeah, people put photos on Facebook, but not in that kind of systematic, calculated way.

"Some Australian citizens are going to be completely freaked out."

Original Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-05/facial-recognition-coag-privacy-concerns-about-the-capability/9017494

Citation: Jake Evans and Clare Sibthorpe, "Facial recognition: Feature creep may impose government's software in our lives, expert warns", ABC News, October 5, 2017. Available: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-05/facial-recognition-coag-privacy-concerns-about-the-capability/9017494

Spectrum in Motion: RadComms 2017

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From network revolutions to micro-chipping humans and uberveillance—set against a backdrop of rapidly approaching 5G networks—RadComms 2017 aims to challenge and inform spectrum planning and reform for the benefit of all Australians.

With a theme of Spectrum reform—empowering users, this year’s event, which runs 1– 2 November in Sydney, features decision-makers and thought-leaders from government and industry to provide an opportunity to find out about—and influence—spectrum reform in Australia.

Minister for Communications, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield, will deliver the opening address, while Nerida O’Loughlin, Chair of the Australian Communications and Media Authority, will make her inaugural address to RadComms. Keynote speeches will be made by ACCC Chairman Rod Sims and Professor Katina Michael, Editor in Chief of the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, who will speak about our headlong progress towards an ‘internet of us’.

Senior ACMA representatives will be joined by experts from Telstra, Ericsson, SES Satellites, Vertel, NNN Co, Myriota, Qualcomm, RTT, RMIT and GoGo, as well as industry groups Communications Alliance, Free TV Australia, AMTA and ARCIA.

Key sessions delivered over the two-day conference include:

• spectrum reform—perspectives from industry about spectrum reform and workshops on three important areas of spectrum reform – radiocommunications licensing, equipment rules and interference management

• network (r)evolutions—evolution and revolution in terrestrial, mobile and satellite networks

• building the industrial internet— How IoT and 5G are enabling a fourth – and global – industrial revolution

• future ACMA activities—our work program, planning issues and spectrum auctions

• emerging standards and new applications—5G, mmWave, satellites and 3GPP processes.

Read more at: https://www.radioinfo.com.au/news/spectrum-motion-radcomms-2017 © Radioinfo.com.au

 

AFR Innovation Summit

AFR Innovation Summit: Pip Marlow, Larry Marshall, Alex Zelinsky

Quantum Computing - the race is on (left to right) Dr Alex Zelinsky, Chief Defence Scientist, Department of Defence Gro, Hugh Bradlow, Chief Scientist, Telstra, Michael Brett, CEO, QxBranch, Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology ? UNSW Australia and Paul Smith, Technology Editor, Australian Financial Review. Copyright AFR. Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teLGbFrc  Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook

Quantum Computing - the race is on (left to right) Dr Alex Zelinsky, Chief Defence Scientist, Department of Defence Gro, Hugh Bradlow, Chief Scientist, Telstra, Michael Brett, CEO, QxBranch, Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology ? UNSW Australia and Paul Smith, Technology Editor, Australian Financial Review. Copyright AFR.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teLGbFrc 
Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook

1.34 pm

The panel is discussing the importance of ethics in innovation and that it has to be considered at all levels. 
Discussing accountability Professor Katina Michael from the School of Computing at the University of Wollongong says, it's everybody's responsibility to discuss regulation - whether it's self-regulation - or industry guidelines, or law. "We need to keep talking and we need corporations to speak to NGOs.
"If you really want to engage NGOs and consumers actually talk to them," she says.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teIZszto 
Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook"

Photo by Véronique Henrisson

Photo by Véronique Henrisson

Original sourcehttp://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf

Original remarks on LinkedIN here by INFORMA Producer Véronique Henrisson.

Emerging Technologies: In The Loop Gong

We sat down with bright mind professor Katina Michael to talk about her research into emerging technologies like wearable tech, nanotechnology, and biohacking.

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Biometric Behavioural Analytics

– Professor Katina Michael – Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at University of Wollongong chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about facial recognition technology and whether it could distinguish between twins.

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Citation: Katina Michael speaks with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, "Can twins fool facial recognition technology?", Talking Technology on Talking Lifestyle at 8.40pm-9.00pm, September 7, 2017.

Original source: https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/can-twins-fool-facial-recognition-technology

Is Facebook Making Us Sad?

Thank you to Philip Clark for the invitation to NightLife this week! Facebook use and social implications is such an important topic with 2 billion monthly active users presently (and set to further increase).

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More than 1 billion people sign into Facebook every day which includes approximately 9 million Australians - to either post a selfie, to get the latest happenings from around the globe or to see what their friends have been up to. One would assume that the world’s most popular networking site would enhance our life in some way, but surprisingly new research suggests the opposite. Could social media be taking a toll on our emotional wellbeing?

Professor Katina Michael from the University of Wollongong, and Psychologist Philipa Thornton join Phil Clark to discuss the impact of social media on our lives.

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Duration: 49min 29sec

Broadcast: Wed 6 Sep 2017, 10:00pm

Published: Wed 6 Sep 2017, 11:40pm

Original source: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/social-media/8879978

More on Philip Clark here: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/people/philip-clark/7820896

Biohacking - In the Loop

Love our local "In the Loop" program which is going from strength to strength. What a great place Wollongong is!

Published on 29 Aug 2017

This month Lachy meets some comedians and vampires at the Anywhere Theatre Festival. Greg Ellis chats with Illawarra Steelers legend Brett Rodwell. Marty has a go at beach fishing with Guided Beach Fishing Illawarra. Katina Michael teaches us about implantables and other emerging technologies. Our Innovative Business is Wollongong born start-up Binary Beer & Christie takes Crammy & Brittany from i98FM on a winery tour thanks to Foodscape tours.

In This Months Episode

Adventure and Play - http://guidedbeachfishing.com.au/
Eat & Drink - Foodscape Tours - http://foodscapetours.com.au/
Berry Chocolatier - https://www.facebook.com/berrychocola...
Silos Estate - http://silosestate.com/
Camberwarra Estate - http://www.cambewarraestate.com.au/
Coolangatta Estate - http://www.coolangattaestate.com.au/
Two Figs Winery - http://twofigs.com.au/
Binary Beer - http://www.binarybeer.io/
Anywhere Theatre Festival - http://anywheretheatre.com/

You can stay in the loop with us on:
Our Website - http://intheloop.tv
Facebook: https://facebook.com/intheloopgong
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intheloopgong
Instagram: https://instagram.com/intheloopgong

Media partners:
i98fm - http://i98fm.com.au

Segment sponsors:
Wollongong Central - http://www.wollongongcentral.com.au
University of Wollongong - http://www.uow.edu.au
Access Law Group - http://www.accesslawgroup.com.au
The Illawarra Mercury - http://www.illawarramercury.com.au
Advantage Wollongong - http://www.advantagewollongong.com.au
Destination Wollongong - http://visitwollongong.com.au
Internetrix - http://www.internetrix.com.au
Relativity Films - http://relativity.com.au
Lancaster Law & Mediation - http://lancasterlaw.com.au
Kaizen Business & Financial - http://www.kaizenbf.com.au


Promotional Partners:
Illawarra Hawks - http://www.hawks.com.au
Digital Print Bureau - http://digitalprintbureau.com.au
Illawarra Women In Business - http://www.iwib.com.au
Novotel Northbeach - http://novotelnorthbeach.com.au
Dee Kramer Photography - http://www.deekramer.com
St George Illawarra Dragons - http://www.dragons.com.au

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Why do we risk our safety for our smartphones?

Presented by Channel 7 Sunrise Reporter: Shaun Cameron White @Shaun_YT.

We're so engrossed in our devices, but the danger goes beyond a funny phone fail. Shaun White reports.

When Cameras can Hear and See: The Implications of Behavioural Biometrics

Ms Jennifer Luu is a student at the University of Technology, Sydney completing a Bachelor of Journalism. She also has begun producing stories at 2SER. I am appreciative that our interview on behavioural biometrics was recorded and transcribed by Jennifer herself. Above an audio download, and the full transcription available here.