Spectrum in Motion: RadComms 2017

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From network revolutions to micro-chipping humans and uberveillance—set against a backdrop of rapidly approaching 5G networks—RadComms 2017 aims to challenge and inform spectrum planning and reform for the benefit of all Australians.

With a theme of Spectrum reform—empowering users, this year’s event, which runs 1– 2 November in Sydney, features decision-makers and thought-leaders from government and industry to provide an opportunity to find out about—and influence—spectrum reform in Australia.

Minister for Communications, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield, will deliver the opening address, while Nerida O’Loughlin, Chair of the Australian Communications and Media Authority, will make her inaugural address to RadComms. Keynote speeches will be made by ACCC Chairman Rod Sims and Professor Katina Michael, Editor in Chief of the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, who will speak about our headlong progress towards an ‘internet of us’.

Senior ACMA representatives will be joined by experts from Telstra, Ericsson, SES Satellites, Vertel, NNN Co, Myriota, Qualcomm, RTT, RMIT and GoGo, as well as industry groups Communications Alliance, Free TV Australia, AMTA and ARCIA.

Key sessions delivered over the two-day conference include:

• spectrum reform—perspectives from industry about spectrum reform and workshops on three important areas of spectrum reform – radiocommunications licensing, equipment rules and interference management

• network (r)evolutions—evolution and revolution in terrestrial, mobile and satellite networks

• building the industrial internet— How IoT and 5G are enabling a fourth – and global – industrial revolution

• future ACMA activities—our work program, planning issues and spectrum auctions

• emerging standards and new applications—5G, mmWave, satellites and 3GPP processes.

Read more at: https://www.radioinfo.com.au/news/spectrum-motion-radcomms-2017 © Radioinfo.com.au

 

AFR Innovation Summit

AFR Innovation Summit: Pip Marlow, Larry Marshall, Alex Zelinsky

Quantum Computing - the race is on (left to right) Dr Alex Zelinsky, Chief Defence Scientist, Department of Defence Gro, Hugh Bradlow, Chief Scientist, Telstra, Michael Brett, CEO, QxBranch, Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology ? UNSW Australia and Paul Smith, Technology Editor, Australian Financial Review. Copyright AFR. Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teLGbFrc  Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook

Quantum Computing - the race is on (left to right) Dr Alex Zelinsky, Chief Defence Scientist, Department of Defence Gro, Hugh Bradlow, Chief Scientist, Telstra, Michael Brett, CEO, QxBranch, Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, ARC Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology ? UNSW Australia and Paul Smith, Technology Editor, Australian Financial Review. Copyright AFR.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teLGbFrc 
Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook

1.34 pm

The panel is discussing the importance of ethics in innovation and that it has to be considered at all levels. 
Discussing accountability Professor Katina Michael from the School of Computing at the University of Wollongong says, it's everybody's responsibility to discuss regulation - whether it's self-regulation - or industry guidelines, or law. "We need to keep talking and we need corporations to speak to NGOs.
"If you really want to engage NGOs and consumers actually talk to them," she says.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf#ixzz4teIZszto 
Follow us: @FinancialReview on Twitter | financialreview on Facebook"

Photo by Véronique Henrisson

Photo by Véronique Henrisson

Original sourcehttp://www.afr.com/technology/afr-innovation-summit-pip-marlow-larry-marshall-alex-zelinsky-20170919-gykujf

Original remarks on LinkedIN here by INFORMA Producer Véronique Henrisson.

Emerging Technologies: In The Loop Gong

We sat down with bright mind professor Katina Michael to talk about her research into emerging technologies like wearable tech, nanotechnology, and biohacking.

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Meow Meow with his implantable Opal Card using NSW Rail Reader

Biometric Behavioural Analytics

– Professor Katina Michael – Professor at the School of Computing and Information Technology at University of Wollongong chats to Trevor Long and Nick Bennett on Talking Technology about facial recognition technology and whether it could distinguish between twins.

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Citation: Katina Michael speaks with Trevor Long and Nick Bennett, "Can twins fool facial recognition technology?", Talking Technology on Talking Lifestyle at 8.40pm-9.00pm, September 7, 2017.

Original source: https://omny.fm/shows/talking-technology/can-twins-fool-facial-recognition-technology

Is Facebook Making Us Sad?

Thank you to Philip Clark for the invitation to NightLife this week! Facebook use and social implications is such an important topic with 2 billion monthly active users presently (and set to further increase).

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More than 1 billion people sign into Facebook every day which includes approximately 9 million Australians - to either post a selfie, to get the latest happenings from around the globe or to see what their friends have been up to. One would assume that the world’s most popular networking site would enhance our life in some way, but surprisingly new research suggests the opposite. Could social media be taking a toll on our emotional wellbeing?

Professor Katina Michael from the University of Wollongong, and Psychologist Philipa Thornton join Phil Clark to discuss the impact of social media on our lives.

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Duration: 49min 29sec

Broadcast: Wed 6 Sep 2017, 10:00pm

Published: Wed 6 Sep 2017, 11:40pm

Original source: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/social-media/8879978

More on Philip Clark here: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/people/philip-clark/7820896

Biohacking - In the Loop

Love our local "In the Loop" program which is going from strength to strength. What a great place Wollongong is!

Published on 29 Aug 2017

This month Lachy meets some comedians and vampires at the Anywhere Theatre Festival. Greg Ellis chats with Illawarra Steelers legend Brett Rodwell. Marty has a go at beach fishing with Guided Beach Fishing Illawarra. Katina Michael teaches us about implantables and other emerging technologies. Our Innovative Business is Wollongong born start-up Binary Beer & Christie takes Crammy & Brittany from i98FM on a winery tour thanks to Foodscape tours.

In This Months Episode

Adventure and Play - http://guidedbeachfishing.com.au/
Eat & Drink - Foodscape Tours - http://foodscapetours.com.au/
Berry Chocolatier - https://www.facebook.com/berrychocola...
Silos Estate - http://silosestate.com/
Camberwarra Estate - http://www.cambewarraestate.com.au/
Coolangatta Estate - http://www.coolangattaestate.com.au/
Two Figs Winery - http://twofigs.com.au/
Binary Beer - http://www.binarybeer.io/
Anywhere Theatre Festival - http://anywheretheatre.com/

You can stay in the loop with us on:
Our Website - http://intheloop.tv
Facebook: https://facebook.com/intheloopgong
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intheloopgong
Instagram: https://instagram.com/intheloopgong

Media partners:
i98fm - http://i98fm.com.au

Segment sponsors:
Wollongong Central - http://www.wollongongcentral.com.au
University of Wollongong - http://www.uow.edu.au
Access Law Group - http://www.accesslawgroup.com.au
The Illawarra Mercury - http://www.illawarramercury.com.au
Advantage Wollongong - http://www.advantagewollongong.com.au
Destination Wollongong - http://visitwollongong.com.au
Internetrix - http://www.internetrix.com.au
Relativity Films - http://relativity.com.au
Lancaster Law & Mediation - http://lancasterlaw.com.au
Kaizen Business & Financial - http://www.kaizenbf.com.au


Promotional Partners:
Illawarra Hawks - http://www.hawks.com.au
Digital Print Bureau - http://digitalprintbureau.com.au
Illawarra Women In Business - http://www.iwib.com.au
Novotel Northbeach - http://novotelnorthbeach.com.au
Dee Kramer Photography - http://www.deekramer.com
St George Illawarra Dragons - http://www.dragons.com.au

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Why do we risk our safety for our smartphones?

Presented by Channel 7 Sunrise Reporter: Shaun Cameron White @Shaun_YT.

We're so engrossed in our devices, but the danger goes beyond a funny phone fail. Shaun White reports.

When Cameras can Hear and See: The Implications of Behavioural Biometrics

Ms Jennifer Luu is a student at the University of Technology, Sydney completing a Bachelor of Journalism. She also has begun producing stories at 2SER. I am appreciative that our interview on behavioural biometrics was recorded and transcribed by Jennifer herself. Above an audio download, and the full transcription available here.

In My Mind

Today’s woman is sold on the idea you can have it all. But this has transformed into an expectation; you must do it all. These unhealthy expectations driving an anxiety epidemic are explored in this new series from Attitude Pictures. 'In My Mind' is a ground-breaking four-part television series that will premiere on TVNZ 1 Sunday 16th July at 8:30am, and available to watch internationally on our website AttitudeLive.com

Via raw and honest interviews with New Zealand and Australian women of all ages, alongside expert opinion, this four-part series delves into stress, anxiety and mental health. Directed by four Kiwi female directors, each episode focuses on a different catalyst including social media addiction, the challenges of motherhood, body image and burnout as well as techniques to live in these increasingly challenging times.

Are you an addict? Turns out we're all tech junkies

How many times have you looked at your phone today?

Chances are you're looking at it right now.

Before you try and deny you're addicted, here are some stats to consider:

Australian men unlock their phones more than anyone in the world - on average 45 to 46 times a day, while for Australian women it is around 42 times.

Those figures have been calculated by AntiSocial, an app developed by Melbourne software company Bugbean, to monitor people's use of social media.

It is a free app with no ads that is only available on Android because the creators say Apple does not allow such monitoring, but the idea is to encourage users to put down their devices.

Australians spend around two hours a day on apps

According to AntiSocial's developer Chris Eade, Australian men and women spend about two hours a day on their phones, and that is not including use for music streaming, video streaming, or making calls - that is pure Facebook, web surfing, WhatsApp, Instagram, and Snapchat.

VIDEO: Watch the discussion between Emma Alberici, Adam Atler and Katina Michael (Lateline)

Adam Alter, from the Stern School of Business, has written a book called Irresistible - why we can't stop checking, scrolling, clicking and watching.

He told Lateline around 50 per cent of the adult population has some form of behavioural addiction.

"I think you can ask yourself if you have a problem and you'll know," he said.

"[People] feel that their lives are being encroached upon by devices, their social lives, maybe their relationships with their loved ones and friends. They're not experiencing nature. They're not exercising."

Our boredom threshold at rock bottom

Mr Alter said smartphones have changed human behaviour so much that we no longer allow ourselves to experience being bored.

"Our boredom threshold has declined to the point where you'll get in an elevator for five seconds, take out your phone," he said.

Hooked on social media

All in the Mind zooms in on the relationship between social media use and our mental health.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/allinthemind/hooked-on-social-media/7885492

"Boredom is very important for productivity, for creativity and new ideas, and if you never allow yourself to be bored, you will never have those ideas."

Mr Alter has written about a private school near Silicon Valley that uses no technology, yet surprisingly 75 per cent of the students' parents work in the tech sector.

"You'd think their children would be the biggest users of tech. But what you actually find, it's the reverse that a lot of these tech titans refuse to let their kids near technology," he said.

"Steve Jobs in 2010 in an interview said things like, 'you should use this device, but we do not allow it in our home and we won't let our kids near it'. He was talking about the iPad."

How to break up with your device

Katina Michael, from the University of Wollongong's School of Computing and IT, specialises in online addiction, and she told Lateline that tech companies have a lot to answer for.

"I think it's extremely hypocritical," she said.

"The laptop's not made you smarter and more intelligent. I think the companies that Adam was talking about need to recheck their ethics and I think our children need to stop being sold the wrong story about what is going to make their future brighter. We have a lot to answer for as academics."

Professor Michael had this advice for tech addicts looking to wean themselves off their devices:

"Think about replacing the activities that you have done online with offline activities, whether it's going for physical exercise, joining a community group or just getting a job, or just speaking with your family and making real food instead of playing a game about making food," she said.

If you're still questioning whether or not you're addicted, compare how you stack up to AntiSocial's biggest user.

"Our biggest user we have at the moment is a woman in America who uses her phone for 7.5 hours a day, every day on average," Mr Eade said.

"That's a full time job."

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-25/are-you-an-addict-how-australians-are-tech-junkies/8554532