CFP: Robotics and Social Implications (IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, March 2018)

Guest Editors

Ramona Pringle (Ryerson University), Diana Bowman (Arizona State University), Meg Leta Jones (Georgetown University), Katina Michael (University of Wollongong)

Background

Robots have been used in a variety of applications, everything from healthcare to automation. Robots for repetitive actions exude accuracy and specificity. Robots don’t get tired, although they do require maintenance, they can be on 24x7, although stoppages in process flows can happen frequently due to a variety of external factors. It is a fallacy that robots don’t require human inputs and can literally run on their own without much human intervention. And yet, there is a fear surrounding the application of robots mostly swelled by sensational media reports and the science fiction genre. Anthropomorphic robots have also caused a great deal of concern for consumer advocate groups who take the singularity concept very seriously.

Stephanie Dinkins  and Bina48, Sentients (Video Still), 2015

Stephanie Dinkins and Bina48, Sentients (Video Still), 2015

It is the job of technologists to dispel myths about robotics, and to raise awareness and in so doing robot literacy, the reachable limits of artificial intelligence imbued into robots, and the positive benefits that can be gained by future developments in the field. This special will focus on the hopes of robot application in non-traditional areas and the plausible intended and unintended consequences of such a trajectory.

Getting Social: Robot Therapists Help Acclimate Children with Autism. Source: http://www.paperdroids.com/2013/02/26/getting-social-robot-therapists-help-acclimate-children-with-autism/

Getting Social: Robot Therapists Help Acclimate Children with Autism. Source: http://www.paperdroids.com/2013/02/26/getting-social-robot-therapists-help-acclimate-children-with-autism/

Engineers in sensor development, artificial consciousness, components assemblage, visual and aesthetic artistry are encouraged to engage with colleagues from across disciplines- philosophers, sociologists and anthropologists, humanities scholars, experts in English and creative writing, journalists and communications specialists- to engage in this call.

Multidisciplinary teams of researchers are requested to submit papers addressing pressing socio-ethical issues in order to provide inputs on how to build more robust robotics that will address citizen issues. For example:

  • How can self driving cars make more ethical decisions?
  • How can co-working with robots becoming an acceptable practice to humans?
  • How might their be more fluent interactions between humans and robots?
  • Can drones have privacy-by-design incorporated into their controls?

This issue calls for technical strategic-level and high-level design papers that have a social science feel to them, and are written for a general audience. The issue encourages researchers to ponder on the socio-ethical implications stemming from their developments, and how they might be discussed in the general public.

Source: https://cdn.techinasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/robot-helps-elderly-people-exercise.jpg

Source: https://cdn.techinasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/robot-helps-elderly-people-exercise.jpg

Broad Vertical Sectors

•    Driverless cars, buses, transportation
•    Military robots
•    Security robots
•    Assistive technologies
•    Robots as companions
•    Robots as co-workers
•    Ageing population
•    Children with syndromes
•    Learning technologies
•    Mentorship
•    Sex trade
•    Conversation

 

Multidisciplinary Angles:
•    Privacy-enhanced technologies, privacy by design, security, ethics
•    Legal entity, trust, control, moral agency, authority, autonomy, liberty, regulatory
•    Cultural, philosophical, anthropological, sociological, critical, phenomenological, normative
•    Real, virtual, conscious, artificial intelligence, anthropomorphic

 

Proposed Schedule

Paper Submission: April 30, 2017

Author Notification of Paper Acceptance: August 1, 2017

Final Revised Paper: November 1, 2017

Publication Date: March 1, 2018

 

How to Submit

Formatting guidelines for IEEE Technology and Society Magazine are available here. Select the Magazine menu  and go to "Information for Authors".

All papers are to be submitted to https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tsm

During the submission process you will be asked to enter in your details if you are a new author to the Magazine. You will also be asked to enter the names and email address of three academics who might be able to review your article. These individuals must not be close contacts.

Papers cannot go over 5,000 words, including references. A variety of paper types are acceptable including: commentaries, opinion pieces, leading edge, industry views, book reviews, peer reviewed articles etc.

Guest Editor Biographies

Ramona Pringle

Ramona Pringle is an Assistant Professor in the RTA School of Media at Ryerson University and Director of the Transmedia Zone, an incubator for innovation in media and storytelling. As a writer, producer and digital journalist, Ramona’s work examines the evolving relationship between humans and technology. She is a technology columnist with CBC, and the writer and director of the interactive documentary “Avatar Secrets.” Previously, she was the interactive producer of PBS Frontline’s “Digital Nation” and editor in chief of “Rdigitalife”. Ramona is a co-editor of the IEEE Potentials Magazine special edition, “Unintended Consequences: the Paradox of Technological Potential” (2016) and an associate editor of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. Ramona’s projects have been featured at festivals and conferences including i-docs, Power to the Pixel, TFI Interactive, Sheffield Doc/Fest, Hot Docs, SXSW, NXNE, Social Media Week, TEDx, and in publications including the New York Times, Mashable, Cult of Mac and the Huffington Post. Ramona has a Master’s Degree from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program.

Diana Bowman

Diana M. Bowman is an Associate Professor in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law  and the  School  for  the  Future  of  Innovation  and  Society  at  Arizona State University,  and a visiting  scholar  in  the  Faculty  of  Law  at  KU  Leuven.  Diana’s research has primarily focused on the legal and policy issues associated with emerging technologies, and public health law. Diana has a BSc, a LLB and a PhD in Law from Monash University, Australia. In August 2011 she was admitted to practice as a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Victoria (Australia).

Meg Leta Jones

Prof. Meg Leta (previously Ambrose) Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Communication, Culture & Technology program at Georgetown University where she researches rules and technological change with a focus on privacy, data protection, and automation in information and communication technologies. She is also an affiliate faculty member of the Science, Technology, and International Affairs program in Georgetown's School of Foreign Service, the Center for Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law Center, and the Brussels Privacy Hub at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Dr. Jones's research interests cover issues including comparative information and communication technology law, engineering and information ethics, critical information and data studies, robotics law and policy, and the legal history of technology. She engages with indisciplinary fields like cyberlaw, science and technology studies, and communication and information policy using comparative, interpretive, legal, and historical methods. Ctrl+Z: The Right to be Forgotten, her first book, is about the social, legal, and technical issues surrounding digital oblivion. Advised by Paul Ohm, Dr. Jones earned a Ph.D. in Technology, Media & Society from the University of Colorado, Engineering and Applied Science (ATLAS). Prior to pursuing a Ph.D., she earned a J.D. from the University of Illinois College of Law in 2008, where she focused on technology and information issues. She has held fellowships and research positions with the NSF funded eCSite project in the University of Colorado Department of Computer Science, the Silicon Flatirons Center at the University of Colorado School of Law, the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and CableLabs. Since 2013, Dr. Jones has been teaching and researching in Washington, DC at Georgetown University.

Katina Michael

Katina Michael is a professor in the School of Computing and Information Technology at the University of Wollongong.  She is the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine editor-in-chief and also serves as the senior editor of the IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine. Since 2008 she has been a board member of the Australian Privacy Foundation, and also served as Vice-Chair. Michael researches on the socio-ethical implications of emerging technologies. She has also conducted research on the regulatory environment surrounding the tracking and monitoring of people using commercial global positioning systems (GPS) applications in the area of dementia, mental illness, parolees, and minors for which she was awarded an Australian Research Council Discovery grant.

IEEE Potentials on "Unintended Consequences" (Pringle, Michael & Michael)

IEEE Potentials is seeking contributions to a special issue guest edited by Ramona Pringle+, Katina Michael* and MG Michael*. The theme of the issue is: “Unintended Consequences: the Paradox of Technological Potential”.

We are looking for critical reviews and analyses, case examples, commentaries, interviews, opinion pieces, stories, projections and science fiction narratives from researchers, futurists, practitioners and storytellers, examining the hidden implications of our ever-digital lives.

While we are open to predictive scenarios of what the near future will bring, we are also looking for contemporary analysis as well. After all, we are living at a time where the line between science fiction and reality is blurring: our relationships are mediated, our memories are archived, and our identities are public documents. What are the implications of rapidly advancing technology on government (e.g. military drones), organizations (e.g. data analytics), and our personal lives (e.g. wearables)?

With all great innovation comes responsibility; an inevitable dark side, and with the exponential growth of technology, the window within which we can examine the ethics and consequences of our adoption of new technologies becomes increasingly narrow. Instead of fear mongering, how do we adjust our course, as a society, before it is too late? We are looking for disruptive perspectives, and articles that present solutions and blueprints, while questioning the status quo. These may take the form of precautionary tales, scenario-based planning and action, assessment impacts and response, design principles, standards, regulations, and laws, organisational policies and approaches to corporate social responsibility, externality fines and penalties for breaches, advocacy, and the formation of specialised global NGOs.

IEEE Potentials is interested in manuscripts that deal with theory, practical applications, or new research. They can be tutorial in nature.

Submissions may consist of either full articles or shorter, opinion-oriented essays. When submitting an article, please remember:

     All manuscripts should be written at the level of the student audience.

     Articles without equations are preferred; however, a minimum of equations is acceptable.

     List no more than 12 references at the end of your manuscript. No embedded reference numbers should be included in the text. If you need to attribute the source of key points or quotes, state names in the text and give the full reference at the end.

     Limit figures to ten or fewer, and include captions for each.

     Articles should be approximately 1,500–4,000 words in length; essays should be 900–1,000 words.

     Include an individual e-mail address and a brief biography of four to six lines for each author.

All submitted manuscripts are evaluated by the IEEE Potentials reviewer team and graded in accordance with the above guidelines. Articles may be required to go through multiple revisions depending on reviewers’ grades and comments.

 

Timeline:

CFP distribution: 30 November 2015

Expression of interest (abstract submission): 8 January 2016

Feedback to authors: 15 January 2016

Final paper submission: 15 March 2016

Proof back to authors: 15 April 2016

Publication Date: July/August 2016 (vol. 35, no. 4)

 

Guest Editors

+Ramona Pringle is an Assistant Professor at the RTA School of Media at Ryerson University.

*Katina Michael is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at the University of Wollongong.

*MG Michael is an honorary Associate Professor in the School of Computing and Information Sciences at the University of Wollongong.