CFP: Socio-ethical Approaches to Robotics Development (IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, March 2018)

Background

Converging approaches adopted by engineers, computer scientists and software developers have brought together niche skillsets in robotics for the purposes of a complete product, prototype or application. Some robotics developments have been met with criticism, especially those of an anthropomorphic nature or in a collaborative task with humans. Due to the emerging role of robotics in our society and economy, there is an increasing need to engage social scientists and more broadly humanities scholars in the field. In this manner we can furthermore ensure that robots are developed and implemented considering the socio-ethical implications that they raise.

Source: https://www.robots.com/images/Robot%20Integration.jpg

Source: https://www.robots.com/images/Robot%20Integration.jpg

This call for papers, supposes that more recently, projects have brought on board personnel with a multidisciplinary background to ask those all important questions about “what if” or “what might be” at a time that the initial idea generation is occurring to achieve a human-centered design. The ability to draw these approaches into the “design” process, means that areas of concern to the general public are addresses. These might include issues surrounding consumer privacy, citizen security, individual trust, acceptance, control, safety, fear of job loss and more.

In introducing participatory practices into the design process, preliminary results can be reached to inform the developers of the way in which they should consider a particular course of action. This is not to halt the freedom of the designer, but rather to consider the value-laden responsibility that designers have in creating things for the good of humankind, independent of their application.

This call seeks to include novel research results demonstrated on working systems that incorporate in a multidisciplinary approach technological solutions which respond to socio-ethical issues. Ideally this Robotics and Automation Magazine paper is complemented by a paper submitted in parallel to Technology and Society Magazine that investigates the application from a socio-ethical viewpoint. 

ARLINGTON, Va. (Nov. 9, 2010) Greg Trafton, center, a cognitive scientist with the Naval Research Laboratory, discusses Octavia, left, an MDS or mobile, dexterous, social robot, to exhibit hall attendees during day two of the Office of Naval Research 2010 Naval Science and Technology Partnership Conference. Octavia is part of the Office of Naval Research human robotics interaction research program which focuses on the abilities of teams of humans and autonomous systems to communicate clearly, collaborate to solve problems, and interact via means both locally and remotely. U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams - This Image was released by the United States Navy with the ID 101109-N-7676W-127. 

ARLINGTON, Va. (Nov. 9, 2010) Greg Trafton, center, a cognitive scientist with the Naval Research Laboratory, discusses Octavia, left, an MDS or mobile, dexterous, social robot, to exhibit hall attendees during day two of the Office of Naval Research 2010 Naval Science and Technology Partnership Conference. Octavia is part of the Office of Naval Research human robotics interaction research program which focuses on the abilities of teams of humans and autonomous systems to communicate clearly, collaborate to solve problems, and interact via means both locally and remotely. U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams - This Image was released by the United States Navy with the ID 101109-N-7676W-127. 

Schedule:

March 10 - Call for papers

August 1 - Submission deadline

October 1 - Author notification

November 15 - Revised paper submitted

November 25 - End of the second review round

November 30 - Final acceptance decision communicated to Authors

December 10 - Final manuscripts uploaded by authors

March 10, 2018 -  issue mailed to all members

* Information for authors can be found here.