Data stewardship in a multilateral world

Beckett Sterner

Beckett Sterner

Title: Data stewardship in a multilateral world

Abstract: What are the limits to a centralized approach for biodiversity data? I review some important costs to assuming a single, authoritative database or ontology can adequately support data discovery, integration, and scientific advances simultaneously. I then describe important future challenges to proving the value of a decentralized approach to data stewardship.

Biography: Beckett Sterner studies how mathematics is transforming biology, including biodiversity data aggregation, evolution of biological individuality, evolutionary tempo and mode, and methodology in systematic biology. He came to ASU in 2016 as an assistant professor in the Biology and Society Program and affiliated faculty in philosophy.

He started his career working in a computational biology lab studying protein function during college at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and then switched to doing history and philosophy of science for his doctorate at the University of Chicago. He was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the Field Museum in Chicago (2012-2014) and a postdoctoral fellow with the University of Michigan Society of Fellows (2014-2016).

What to do when the data resists datafication

Christy Spackman

Christy Spackman

Title: What to do when the data resists datafication

Abstract: From pain to smell, sensory experiences continue to resist datification. This short thought experiment invites participants to think alongside fish swimming in contaminated waters to imagine what data stewardship currently looks like -- and could look like -- in the absence of quantifiable data. 

Bio: Christy Spackman is an assistant professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. She studies the environmental and social impact of scientific and technological efforts to manipulate sensory experiences of smelling and tasting. The recipient of fellowships at New York University and the Ecole Normale Supérieure, as well as fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies, she’s writing “Making Nothing: the twentieth-century transformation of water.”