Discovering biodiversity data signals from natural history collections

Title: Discovering biodiversity data signals from natural history collections

Nico Franz

Nico Franz

Abstract: This presentation will illustrate how digitized, networked biodiversity data from natural history collections can be discovered and visualized to foster an understanding of data availability and suitability of data-driven analysis and decision making. The focus is on Arizona and on data and services produced by Arizona State University's Natural History Collections. The presentation will demonstrate how ASU's biocollections are currently discoverable through a series of public portals sustained by the Symbiota software platform - a popular, open source, ASU-developed information management system that offers a broad range of biodiversity data research and learning opportunities (https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1114). The examples will hopefully stimulate discussions about integrating collections-based data with the overall workshop theme and its different components.

Bio: Nico Franz studies the systematics and evolutionary history of weevils - a lineage of plant feeding beetles estimated to include some 220,000 species worldwide. At ASU, he is the curator of the Hasbrouck Insect Collection, lead coordinator of the Natural History Collections, director of the Biodiversity Knowledge Integration Center (BioKIC), and principal investigator of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Biorepository. He tweets @taxonbytes.